2nd Lieutenant

Commemorating the Fallen of WW1

Today we remember …

The grave of Frederick Haden at Monchy-le-Preux. Photographed for Marching in Memory, July 2015

The grave of Frederick Haden at Monchy-le-Preux. Photographed for Marching in Memory, July 2015

Battle of Passchendaele / 3rd Battle of Ypres

4th November 1917

Frederick Haden, H Social 1913. 2nd Lt, 11th Trench Mortar Battery. Killed in action, Passchendaele

Last year he passed the entrance examination at Trinity College, Cambridge, and the “Little Go,” but had not gone into residence. He went to the front on June 8, and after a short time with his battalion was attached to the T.M. Battery. His Captain expresses “the deepest sympathy and sorrow felt by the officers N.C.O.’s, and men of the battery, with whom he was a great favourite, and also the share in your loss, in that we have lost a most capable and efficient officer.”

The C.F. writes: “I had known him since his earliest days in this division, and known him for a quiet, charming boy a faithful Churchman, and quite fearless. Humanly speaking, we can ill-afford boys like that; they carry in them the promise of a tremendous manhood.”

Aged 19

AND

2nd Lt Frederick Haden. kia Passchendaele

2nd Lt Frederick Haden. kia Passchendaele

George Wilson, MC, F Social 1903. Major, 282nd Bde, Royal Field Artillery. Died of gas poisoning, Passchendaele

After school, he joined the London Stock Exchange.  He married in 1912. He joined up as a Territorial in August 1914, eventually going out to the Western Front in October 1915.  He was mentioned in despatches and promoted to the rank of acting Major.

He was one of four brothers.  His eldest brother (who also won the Military Cross) was killed in action in May 1916; his youngest brother died of wounds in November 1916.  His only surviving brother was serving at the Front with the Royal Field Artillery when George died of gas poisoning.

Aged 27

Major George Wilson, Royal Field Artillery. Died of gas poisoning, Passchendaele

Major George Wilson, Royal Field Artillery. Died of gas poisoning, Passchendaele

George Wilson's grave at Gwalia. Photographed for Marching in Memory, July 2015

George Wilson’s grave at Gwalia. Photographed for Marching in Memory, July 2015

Commemorating the Fallen of WW1

Today we remember …

20th October 1917

John Clark, E Social 1912. 2nd Lt, 196th Siege Battery, Royal Garrison Artillery.  Died of wounds received in an unknown engagement

He won an exhibition for mathematics while he was at Radley. He was also a member of the Officers Training Corps and of the Country Life Shooting Team in 1916-7.

He passed the Woolwich Entrance Examination in November, 1916, but being disqualified owing to short sight, joined the R.G.A. through the Maresfield Park Cadet School, whence he passed out “with honours.” 

He went to the front on September 22. His C.O writes : – “Your son had been only a short time with my battery, but he had already proved himself to be a brave and efficient officer.“

A former master writes : – ” Of all the boys I have had I should pick him out as one I could absolutely trust and honour.“

Aged 19

2nd Lt John Clark, Royal Garrison Artillery.  kia 20 October 1917

2nd Lt John Clark, Royal Garrison Artillery. kia 20 October 1917

Commemorating the Fallen of WW1

Today we remember …

The grave of Norman Albury at Aveloy.  Photographed for Marching in Memory, July 2015

The grave of Norman Albury at Aveloy. Photographed for Marching in Memory, July 2015

15th September 1917

Norman Albury, F & E Socials 1911. 2nd Lt, 21st Squadron, Royal Flying Corps. Died of wounds received in an unknown engagement

He left Radley in July 1916 and joined the RFC in February 1917. At school he was a member of the earliest Rugby XV.

Aged 19

2nd Lt Norman Albury, RFC

2nd Lt Norman Albury, RFC

Commemorating the Fallen of WW1

Today we remember …

6th June 1917

Humphrey Arden, A Social 1906. 2nd Lt, 156th Heavy Battery, Royal Garrison Artillery.  Died of wounds received near Messines

He was a Junior Scholar, Prefect and rowed at stroke for the 1st VIII, competing at Henley twice. He went up to Queens’ College, Cambridge and rowed for the College and the University.  After a short time teaching at Eagle House Prep School, he was preparing to study for the priesthood at Cuddesdon when he joined up.

The Royal Garrison Artillery developed from fortress-based artillery located on British coasts. From 1914 when the army possessed very little heavy artillery it grew into a very large component of the British forces. It was armed with heavy, large calibre guns and howitzers that were positioned some way behind the front line and had immense destructive power.

After his death, his father gave the money for two War Memorial Scholarships in his memory. He is also remembered at his prep school in Oxford, where his story features on their WW1 memorial website.

Aged 25

AND

William Gourlay, B Social 1910. Captain, 5th Bn, Cameron Highlanders.  Died of wounds received in an unknown engagement

He was wounded on May 1st and succumbed to his injuries on June 6th. W.N. Gourlay rose to the position of House Prefect and filled the post with quiet dignity and force of character. Outside his own small circle of friends, among whom he was much loved and respected, he will possibly be chiefly remembered for his introduction of bagpipes to Radley.

Aged 21

2nd Lt Humphrey Arden, Royal Garrison Artillery. Died 6th June 1917

2nd Lt Humphrey Arden, Royal Garrison Artillery. Died 6th June 1917

Commemorating the Fallen of WW1

Today we remember …

The grave of Charles Wilson at Level Crossing Cemetery. Photographed for Marching in Memory, July 2015

The grave of Charles Wilson at Level Crossing Cemetery. Photographed for Marching in Memory, July 2015

24th May 1917

Charles Wilson, MC, F Social 1900. 2nd Lt, 88th Cpy, Machine Gun Corps.  Killed in an unknown engagement

At school he was Head of F Social and Captain of Boats. After school, he went to Pembroke College, Oxford, where he rowed for the University, and then worked for the Dublin Stock Exchange.

Captain of the Boats at Radley, he rowed in the famous Pembroke College Eight of 1906; he also rowed in the Oxford Trial Eights in 1907. In 1912-13 he was Captain of the Lansdowne Football Club. In January, 1916, he was gazetted to the 6th Royal Munster Fusiliers from the Dublin University O.T.C., and went to the front in September, 1916. Later on he joined the Machine Gun Corps, and won the Military Cross, April 23rd, 1917. His Major writes of him : – ” His loss is very keenly felt by us, as he had become such a favourite amongst us all. He had just been awarded the Military Cross for gallantry in action on April 23rd. He was a splendid officer and a loyal and brave comrade.” Another officer writes of him :- He was one of the very best, cool and cheery in danger, and although I personally only knew him for the short period of two months, still I and all the officers, N.C.O.’s and men of the Company, learned to esteem and respect him as an example of the finest type of a soldier and gentleman. Such men as he are hard to replace, and his section would have followed him anywhere and done anything for him.’

Citation for the Military Cross He maintained control of his guns throughout the whole operations in a very effective manner. He inflicted severe losses on the enemy, and his coolness and determination was a splendid example to all.

Aged 31

2nd Lt Charles Wilson, Machine Gun Corps.  kia 24th May 1917

2nd Lt Charles Wilson, Machine Gun Corps. kia 24th May 1917

Commemorating the Fallen of WW1

Today we remember …

The grave of William Lloyd at Faubourg Arras.  Photographed for Marching in Memory, July 2015

The grave of William Lloyd at Faubourg Arras. Photographed for Marching in Memory, July 2015

19th May 1917

William Lloyd, A Social 1907. 2nd Lt, 40th Bde, Royal Field Artillery.  Killed in action, Battle of Arras.

He worked for the newly emerging car industry at the Daimler Factory in Coventry from 1911. Early in 1915 he joined the Royal Horse Artillery, and went through the Somme fighting in the ranks. He was recommended for a commission, and was gazetted to the Royal Field Artillery in February 1917.  He was killed by a German shell.

Aged 23

2nd Lt William Lloyd, Royal Field Artillery.  kia Battle of Arras

2nd Lt William Lloyd, Royal Field Artillery. kia Battle of Arras

Commemorating the Fallen of WW1

The grave of Lewis Sheppard at Varennes. Photographed for Marching in Memory, July 2015

The grave of Lewis Sheppard at Varennes. Photographed for Marching in Memory, July 2015

Today we remember …

21st April 1917

Lewis Sheppard. B Social 1910. Royal Flying Corps.  Killed in a flying accident

Lewis Sheppard left Radley in 1914 to join up as a 2nd Lt in the Somerset Light Infantry. He transferred to the Royal Flying Corps in 1916.

He was a boy of more than average ability. A great talker and with many interests, he has left his mark, though he was not here long enough to become distinguished. He joined the Flying Corps and was killed on April 21 by an accident on his way back to the advanced base in Flanders.

Aged 21

2nd Lt Lewis Sheppard, RFC

2nd Lt Lewis Sheppard, RFC