killed in action

Commemorating the Fallen of WW1

Today we remember …

The grave of Richard Colborne at Dainville. Photographed for ‘Marching in Memory’ July 2015

28th May1918

Richard Colborne, E Social 1900. Chaplain (4th Class), 1st Bn, London Regt

Killed in an unknown engagement near Arras whilst bringing in wounded men

At school, Richard Colborne was an Exhibitioner who won the History and Literature Prizes, was Second Prefect and played for the Football XI.  After school, he won an Exhibition to Worcester College, Oxford, and then trained for the priesthood.  His first curacy was at Great Gaddesdon , Herts.  Then, in 1916, he took up the post of Curate-in-Charge at St John’s Merton.  He was called up in 1917.

He was second Prefect, a member of the Football XI, and won the Senior Quarter by sheer pluck (and incidentally the Sports’ Cup). On leaving, he went up to Worcester College, and later took work at a Preparatory School at Hemel Hampstead. 

He was ordained deacon in 1912 and priest in 1913, and worked at Romford, and later at Merton, where he was most popular and greatly esteemed by his parishioners. He was wounded on Jan. 4, and killed in action on May 28 while assisting in bringing in the wounded. His chief described him as “one of the finest chaplains” he had ever had. He was Secretary of the Radleian Society during 1916-7, and brought out the last Year Book. He leaves very many friends who mourn his death.

Addenda. 2.4.1919 The Radleian. Memorial. A handsome new reading desk has been placed in St. John’s Church, Romford, to commemorate the memory of Rev. R A P . Colborne, T/C.F., who died of wounds last year

As Secretary of the Radleian Society, he was responsible for scouring the newspapers, writing to families and compiling all the information about Radleians serving during WW1.  His meticulous work forms the basis of the War Memorial and of all the records in this Commemoration.

Aged 32

Rev Richard Colborne, Chaplain to the Forces

Commemorating the Fallen of WW1

Today we remember …

14th April 1918

Hugh Malcolmson, Croix de Guerre. C Social 1893. Ambulance Driver, French Red Cross

Killed in action whilst rescuing wounded men

His family was from Ireland.  After leaving school, he was a cattle rancher in Argentina from 1907-9.  He then returned to Ireland where we worked as a farmer.  In 1907 he married Muriel Briscoe.

Aged 38

The burial record of Hugh Malcolmson. ©CWGC

Commemorating the Fallen of WW1

Today we remember …

24th March 1918

Donald MacIver, B Social 1899, Lt, 3rd Bn, South Lancashire Regt

Killed in action, Second Battle of the Somme

He left school before 1902 and became a farmer.  He enlisted with the Liverpool Scottish on 6th August 1914 and went to the Front immediately.  He was wounded in 1914, but returned and served in France until 1918.

His name is recorded on the Pozières Memorial

Aged 33

Donald MacIver, B Social 1902

Donald Maciver’s name on the Pozieres Memorial. Photographed by Nick Bennet & Charlie Barber for ‘Marching in Memory’ July 2015

Commemorating the Fallen of WW1

Today we remember …

22nd March 1918

Thomas Gibbons, MC, A Social 1910, Captain, 1st Bn, Hertfordshire Regt

Killed in action, Second Battle of the Somme

At school he was a Prefect, played for the Cricket XI and was captain of the last Soccer XI before Rugby became the official school sport.

He signed up in 1914 and served in France throughout 1915-1918.  He was mentioned in despatches and awarded the Military Cross.

Tommy was one of the most popular of Radleians; absolutely straight and trusted by all. I doubt if he ever had an enemy. Amusing and inconsequent in his talk, he was always the centre of a cheery group, for it was quite impossible to feel glum or out of temper in his presence. His death will have caused great and abiding sorrow among his countless friends, for he was loved and respected by all. In Oct, 1916, he married Edith Doris Evison, of Homefield, Coulsdon Common.

Aged 23

Captain TP Gibbons, MC, Hertfordshire Regt

Radley College Soccer XI 1913. Thomas Gibbons, Captain

Commemorating the Fallen of WW1

Today we remember …

Second Battle of the Somme

21st March 1918
Reginald Hodgson

John Moore, MC

Horace Stevens

Photographs of the Pozieres and Arras Memorials by Nick Bennett & Charlie Barber for ‘Marching in Memory’ July 2015

Reginald Hodgson, D Social 1893, Captain, 82nd Brigade, Royal Field Artillery. Killed in action, Second Battle of the Somme

At school he was a Junior Scholar, a Prefect and won the English Literature Prize. He represented the School at boxing and went on to receive a half-blue for both boxing and fencing for Oxford University. After school he studied at University College, Oxford, became a barrister at the Inner Temple and an underwriter at Lloyd’s. He was the youngest son of Henry John Hodgson, Master of the Supreme Court of Judicature, and of Mrs. Hodgson, of Keble Road, Oxford. He had his commission early in the war, and was Lieutenant in December, 1914; he was gazetted Captain in February, 1916.

Aged 38

 

AND

Captain Reginald Hodgson

The name of Reginald Hodgson on the Pozieres Memorial.

John Moore, MC, F Social 1907, Major, Cheshire Regt, attached 71st Cpy, Machine Gun Corps, Killed in action, Second Battle of the Somme

Cheshire Regiment, attached Machine Gun Corps (killed in action on March 21), was son of the late Captain G. H. Moore, Camden Hill, Cranbrook, Kent, and of Mrs. Moore, of Filsham House, St. Leonards-on·Sea. He was twenty-four years of age; he had promotion in the Cheshires in November, 1915, and, transferring to the Machine Gun Corps, became acting Captain in June, 1917. He was at Radley, 1907-1909, and had been mentioned twice in despatches..

Aged 24

AND

The name of John Moore, MC, on the Arras Memorial.

Horace Stevens, College Staff, Lance-Corporal, 2nd/4th Bn, Ox & Bucks LI

Killed in action, Second Battle of the Somme

The name of Horace Stevens on the Pozieres Memorial.

Commemorating the Fallen of WW1

Today we remember …

30th December 1917

William ffolkes, D Social 1912. 2nd Lt, King’s Royal Rifle Corps.  Killed in action in an unknown engagement

He was a Prefect and member of the Cricket1st XI.

There is no one who knew him to whom the news of Rupert ffolkes‘ death did not come as a very great grief. Some of us hardly knew he had left Sandhurst, and the appearance of his name in the Casualty Lists seemed almost incredible. It is always difficult in these times to realise that one who has been talking and laughing with us a few weeks, perhaps a few days before, has been killed, but with him it is harder than with almost any one else. It seems but as yesterday that he was batting for the School, or taking his part in Chapel Procession, and we always looked upon him as being so very young.

He had his own ideals, – very simple and very pure they were, – and them he followed with the quiet answering devotion of a Sir Galahad. Religion was a very real thing. It was the highest thing in daily life. Self was a thing that never had a place in his religion, and perhaps that was the reason why one was always sure of sympathy from him in times of trouble. He could always feel and show that he felt for the worries and anxieties of others. And then we come back to the realisation that he is gone.

Aged 19

2nd Lt William ffolkes, KRRC. kia December 1917

2nd Lt William ffolkes, KRRC. kia December 1917

Commemorating the Fallen of WW1

Today we remember …

The grave of Mervyn Gorringe in Polygon Wood. Photographed for Marching in Memory, July 2015

The grave of Mervyn Gorringe in Polygon Wood. Photographed for Marching in Memory, July 2015

12th December 1917

Mervyn Gorringe, D Social 1891. Lance-Corporal, New Zealand Expeditionary Force. Killed in action in an unknown engagement

He rowed for the 1st VIII in 1895.

He emigrated to New Zealand immediately upon leaving school in 1896, where he worked as a sheep farmer.  In 1904 he married Margaret Fraser. He returned to Europe in 1915 as a Lance-Corporal in the New Zealand Expeditionary Force.

Aged 40

Mervyn Gorringe, Radley College Rowing VIII, 1895

Mervyn Gorringe, Radley College Rowing VIII, 1895

Commemorating the Fallen of WW1

Today we remember …

3rd December 1917

Dominic Watson, A Social 1902. Lt, Somerset Light Infantry. Killed in action in an unknown engagement

He was the Master of Bath and County Harriers from 1911-1914.

In October, 1914, he joined the 19th Hussars as a private, but afterwards transferred to the West Somerset Yeomanry. As he was anxious to go oversea he took a commission in the Somerset Light Infantry, and left England in October, 1916. He had seen much severe fighting. His only brother fell in the South African War.

Aged 30

Lt Dominic Watson, Somerset LI

Lt Dominic Watson, Somerset LI