Lieutenant

Commemorating the Fallen of WW1

Today we remember …

3rd December 1917

Dominic Watson, A Social 1902. Lt, Somerset Light Infantry. Killed in action in an unknown engagement

He was the Master of Bath and County Harriers from 1911-1914.

In October, 1914, he joined the 19th Hussars as a private, but afterwards transferred to the West Somerset Yeomanry. As he was anxious to go oversea he took a commission in the Somerset Light Infantry, and left England in October, 1916. He had seen much severe fighting. His only brother fell in the South African War.

Aged 30

Lt Dominic Watson, Somerset LI

Lt Dominic Watson, Somerset LI

Commemorating the Fallen of WW1

Today we remember …

Battle of Passchendaele / 3rd Battle of Ypres


23rd August 1917

Alick Blyth

James Wilson

Maurice Mowbray

Alick Blyth's name on the Tyne Cot Memorial. Photographed for Marching in Memory, July 2015

Alick Blyth’s name on the Tyne Cot Memorial. Photographed for Marching in Memory, July 2015

The grave of James Wilson at Lijssenthoek. Photographed for Marching in Memory, July 2015

The grave of James Wilson at Lijssenthoek. Photographed for Marching in Memory, July 2015

The grave of Maurice Mowbrary at The Huts. Photographed for Marching in Memory, July 2015

The grave of Maurice Mowbrary at The Huts. Photographed for Marching in Memory, July 2015

Alick Blyth, H Social 1910. Senior Prefect, Captain of Cricket and Radley’s first Captain of Rugby

He was killed in action on the Ypres front on Aug. 23rd, 1917, aged 20. His Company Commander writes:

Our battalion was in support, but he was detailed for a special job in the line. There was a strong point called Pond Farm giving a lot of trouble. We had taken it once, but had lost it and were going for it again. Both the D Company officers had been killed, and the remnants of the Company were going over with the attacking party without an officer. Blyth at once went to the Colonel in charge of the attack and insisted on taking this Company over, which he did. The place was captured, but he was sniped through the head. This place was held by Prussians, and had before resisted seven attacks.” Those who knew him are not surprised to hear that he died so gallantly, and that “his Platoon was easily the best in the battalion.” The same officer adds that “he was nearly always ill, but would never go sick, but kept hanging on.”

Blyth had a career full of promise at Radley. Like Geoffrey Adams, whom he succeeded as Senior Prefect for one term, he combined a variety of gifts. He won the Gibbs. Heathcote, and James Scholarships in successive years, 1913-1915. and the Worsley Prize in 1915. In this year he also won a Classical Scholarship at Corpus Christi College, Cambridge. He was in the Cricket Xl in 1915. and played a fine innings against Sherborne; and in the XV in 1914 and 1915. captaining it in the latter year. He was also a keen lover of literature and of nature, especially of birds, moths and butterflies. With these gifts and tastes he combined a character of unassuming gentleness, thoughtfulness, and charm, which gained him a multitude of friends.

His mother gave all the flowers for Chapel for the first Armistice Day service.

Aged 20

 

AND

Alick Blyth. Radley College Rugby XV, 1914

Alick Blyth. Radley College Rugby XV, 1914

Radley College Senior Prefects, 1915-1918: Adams, Blyth and Cancellor all died in WW1

Radley College Senior Prefects, 1915-1918: Adams, Blyth and Cancellor all died in WW1

James Studholme Wilson, MC, E Social 1900. Captain, Ox & Bucks LI, Royal Army Medical Corps

He qualified as a surgeon at the London Hospital.  He married in 1912 and had one son who was awarded one of the War Memorial Scholarships to come to Radley.  The family still maintain their connection with the school.

How much we shall all miss him you can perhaps understand better than I can tell you. He was hit early in the evening, but insisted on going on with his work for six hours after he was wounded. Our admiration for his gallantry and devotion to duty knows no bounds. His name will be a lasting and inspiring memory to the officers and men of this battalion. Two of the stretcher-bearers from his aid post who were with him when he died revisited the site in 1930.  They wrote a poem about the incident entitled ‘The Pilgrimage’.  This was discovered by the descendants of one of them in the 2000s. An excerpt was published in the Old Radleian in 2008.

  1. Citation for the Military Cross. Lieut. J. E. S. Wilson, R.A.M.C. He went up to the front line from his Aid Post through a very heavy barrage, in order to assist the wounded. By his pluck and skill he undoubtedly saved many lives. He afterwards controlled the evacuation of the casualties under heavy fire.

Aged 31

AND

Caotain James Wilson, MC. Royal Army Medical Corps

Caotain James Wilson, MC. Royal Army Medical Corps

Maurice Mowbray, MC, F Social 1910. Lt, 89th Field Company, Royal Engineers.  Killed in action

2016 Citation for the Military Cross. 2nd Lieut. M. C. Mowbray, R.E.

For conspicuous gallantry and determination, notably when consolidating a crater. His work was destroyed four times during the night by shell and trench mortar fire. He kept his party together, and displayed an utter disregard of personal safety.

After school, he trained with the Royal Engineers at Woolwich, intending a military career: He was absolutely fearless and very capable, and his men would follow him anywhere; if only he had been spared he would have done well in the service.

Aged 21

Lt Maurice Mowbray, MC. Killed at Passchendaele

Lt Maurice Mowbray, MC. Killed at Passchendaele

Commemorating the Fallen of WW1

Today we remember …

Clive Moore's name on the Arras Memorial.  Photographed for Marching in Memory, July 2015

Clive Moore’s name on the Arras Memorial. Photographed for Marching in Memory, July 2015

15th August 1917. Clive Moore, H Social 1910. Lt, 43rd Squadron, Royal Flying Corps. Missing in action on 15th August 1917, death confirmed in June 1918

He left Radley just as the war broke out, and took a commission in the Royal Fusiliers. Although he loved the life when training, eventually after serving in France, he transferred to the R.F.C.  He was reported missing on Aug. 15th, and it is now believed that he has been killed, as no news has been received of him since that date.

He was developing into a very strong and capable man, but it was more especially in his straightness of character that he made- his mark amongst all with whom he came into contact.

Aged 20

Commemorating the Fallen of WW1

Today we remember …

Third Battle of Ypres – Passchendaele

31st July 1917. Walter Jessopp, H Social 1909. Lt, Machine Gun Corps.  Killed in action, Passchendaele

His company commander writes :-“He was a great favourite with all my officers and his men loved him. . . His courage and splendid character were brought to the notice of the General commanding the brigade, and he has been mentioned for his good work from time to time.”

Listed on the Menin Gate.

Aged 20

Lt Walter Jessopp, Machine Gun Corps. Killed at Passchendaele

Lt Walter Jessopp, Machine Gun Corps. Killed at Passchendaele

Commemorating the Fallen of WW1

Today we remember …

28th July 1917

Arthur O’Beirne, G Social 1901. Lt, 57th Squadron, Royal Flying Corps.  Killed in action in aerial fighting over Houthulst Forest,  Flanders

At school, he played for the Cricket XI. He then went to Exeter College, Oxford.  He was in India from 1909-1914.  He served with the East African Mounted Rifles, 1914-15, then with the Oxford Light Hussars in 1915, before joining the Royal Flying Corps.

When war broke out he had just arrived in British East Africa, and immediately enlisted as a trooper in the East African Mounted Rifles. After nine months’ fighting he was invalided home, and was then offered a commission in the Oxfordshire Yeomany. In December, 1916, he joined the R.F.C., and after obtaining his pilot’s certificate was for some time in England. He went to the front last July, and died of wounds received in action on the 28th of that month. His only brother, Lieutenant John I. M. O’Beirne, Royal Warwickshire Regiment, attached R.F.C., was killed at the front last April.

Aged 29

Lt Arthur O'Beirne, Royal Flying Corps. kia July 1917

Lt Arthur O’Beirne, Royal Flying Corps. kia July 1917

Commemorating the Fallen of WW1

Today we remember …

The grave of Geoffrey Hodgkinson at Brandhoek.  Photographed for Marching in Memory, July 2015

The grave of Geoffrey Hodgkinson at Brandhoek. Photographed for Marching in Memory, July 2015

24th July 1917

Geoffrey Hodgkinson, G Social 1907. Lt, Royal Field Artillery. Killed in action in an unknown engagement

He was the only son of the Rev. F. K. Hodgkinson, Vicar of St. Peter’s, Forest-gate. He represented the school in the cricket and football elevens. On leaving school he entered the Imperial Tobacco Company, Messrs. Lambert and Butler’s branch. He was in an H.A.C. battery before the war began, and immediately on the outbreak he went on active service. serving abroad as a gunner from March to December, 1915. when he returned home, and received a commission in the R.F.A. in January, 1916. He went to France in the following March, and during part of the time he was there in command of his battery.

Aged 24

Lt Geoffrey Hodgkinson, Royal Field Artillery. kia 24th July 1917

Lt Geoffrey Hodgkinson, Royal Field Artillery. kia 24th July 1917

Commemorating the Fallen of WW1

Today we remember …

Reginald Hargreaves on the Loos Memorial.  Photographed for Marching in Memory, July 2015

Reginald Hargreaves on the Loos Memorial. Photographed for Marching in Memory, July 2015

28th June 1917

Reginald Hargreaves, E Social 1910. Lt, 4th Bn, Durham Light Infantry.  Killed in action in an unknown engagement on his 21st birthday

He joined the Durham L.I. from the O.T.C. in August, 1914, and went to the front in May, 1915. He was severely wounded in October, 1915, and twice again in 1916.His colonel writes:  ‘Your son was killed whilst leading his company in a raid on the enemy’s trenches. During the raid your son’s conduct was most gallant, and his personal bravery was splendid.’

Aged 21

Lt Reginald Hargreaves, Durham LI.  Killed on his 21st birthday

Lt Reginald Hargreaves, Durham LI. Killed on his 21st birthday

Commemorating the Fallen of WW1

Today we remember …

The grave of Laurence Garnett at Brandhoek. Photographed for Marching in Memory, June 2015

The grave of Laurence Garnett at Brandhoek. Photographed for Marching in Memory, July 2015

7th June 1917

Laurence Garnett, G Social 1905. Lt, 100th Anti-Aircraft Battery, Royal Field Artillery. Killed in action, Battle of Messines Ridge

He played for the Cricket and Soccer XIs and represented the school at fencing.  He went to Brasenose College, Oxford.  In 1912, he emigrated to Canada, but returned on the outbreak of the War.

His elder brother was killed at Kut-el-Amara in 1915.

Aged 26

AND

Lt Laurence Garnett, Royal Field Artillery. kia Battle of Messines Ridge

Lt Laurence Garnett, Royal Field Artillery. kia Battle of Messines Ridge

Eric Lambert, MC, D Social 1896. Lt, 8th Bn, Yorkshire Regt.  Died of wounds received in an unknown engagement

At school he was a Prefect and played for the Cricket and Soccer X1s.  After school, from 1904-9, he worked as a merchant with companies in Yokohama and Kobe, Japan, and then in electrical engineering in Kobe from 1910.

Aged 34

Eric Lambert. Radley College Prefects, 1901

Eric Lambert. Radley College Prefects, 1901

The grave of Eric Lambert at Railway Dugouts. Photographed for Marching in Memory, July 2015

The grave of Eric Lambert at Railway Dugouts. Photographed for Marching in Memory, July 2015

Commemorating the Fallen of WW1

Today we remember …

1st June 1917

Norcliffe Gilpin, G Social 1887. Lt, Royal Defence Corps.  Died of pneumonia at the Military Hospital, Tidworth

He worked as a timber merchant and then as Clerk to London County Council. The Royal Defence Corps was founded in 1916 It was initially formed by converting the (Home Service) Garrison battalions of infantry regiments. Garrison battalions were composed of soldiers either too old or medically unfit for active front-line service; the Home Service status indicated they were unable to be transferred overseas. The role of the corps was to provide troops for security and guard duties inside the United Kingdom; guarding important locations such as ports or bridges. It also provided independent companies for guarding prisoner-of-war camps. The corps was never intended to be employed on overseas service.

Aged 44

Commemorating the Fallen of WW1

Today we remember …

27th May 1917

Arthur Knapp, E Social 1890. Lt, Nyasaland Field Force.  Died of illness on active service in East Africa

After school, he worked for a short time as an architect, then became a career soldier, serving with the Ox & Bucks Light Infantry, then the Grahamstown Militia.  He spent 15 years as a planter in Nyasaland (now part of Malawi). He is buried in Dar-es-Salaam cemetery.

He formerly held a commission as second lieutenant in the Militia battalion of the Oxford and Bucks L.I, and served in the South African War with the Grahamstown Town Guard 1901-2, and obtained the Queen’s Medal. For the last 15 years he had been planting cotton in Nyasaland, but on the outbreak of war he joined the force for East Africa. He received a commission as assistant transport officer, and had lately been recruiting carriers from among the natives.

Aged 43

Lt Arthur Knapp, Nyasaland Field Force. Died on active service 27 May 1917

Lt Arthur Knapp, Nyasaland Field Force. Died on active service 27 May 1917