Captain

Commemorating the Fallen of WW1

Today we remember …

Captain John Milne's name on the Arras Flying Services Memorial. Photographed for Marching in Memory, July 2015

Captain John Milne’s name on the Arras Flying Services Memorial. Photographed for Marching in Memory, July 2015

6th October 1917.

John Milne, MC, G Social 1909. Captain, 48th Squadron, Royal Flying Corps. Missing in action on 6th October 1917.  Presumed dead, 1918

He transferred from the Ox & Bucks Light Infantry to the Royal Flying Corps.  He was mentioned in despatches. He married Joan Hanmer in 1917, just a few months before he went missing.

Citation for the Military Cross: Temp. Lt. (Temp. Capt.) J. T. Milne, Gen. List and R.F.C. Whilst leading offensive patrols, he has shown great determination and courage in attacking hostile formations, although in superior numbers, at close range. He has also done long and arduous reconnaissances and secured good photographs under very adverse conditions and heavy fire, displaying throughout an admirable spirit of fearlessness and energy.

Aged 22

Captain John Milne, MC. RFC, missing October 1917

Captain John Milne, MC. RFC, missing October 1917

Commemorating the Fallen of WW1

Today we remember …

Battle of Passchendaele / 3rd Battle of Ypres


23rd August 1917

Alick Blyth

James Wilson

Maurice Mowbray

Alick Blyth's name on the Tyne Cot Memorial. Photographed for Marching in Memory, July 2015

Alick Blyth’s name on the Tyne Cot Memorial. Photographed for Marching in Memory, July 2015

The grave of James Wilson at Lijssenthoek. Photographed for Marching in Memory, July 2015

The grave of James Wilson at Lijssenthoek. Photographed for Marching in Memory, July 2015

The grave of Maurice Mowbrary at The Huts. Photographed for Marching in Memory, July 2015

The grave of Maurice Mowbrary at The Huts. Photographed for Marching in Memory, July 2015

Alick Blyth, H Social 1910. Senior Prefect, Captain of Cricket and Radley’s first Captain of Rugby

He was killed in action on the Ypres front on Aug. 23rd, 1917, aged 20. His Company Commander writes:

Our battalion was in support, but he was detailed for a special job in the line. There was a strong point called Pond Farm giving a lot of trouble. We had taken it once, but had lost it and were going for it again. Both the D Company officers had been killed, and the remnants of the Company were going over with the attacking party without an officer. Blyth at once went to the Colonel in charge of the attack and insisted on taking this Company over, which he did. The place was captured, but he was sniped through the head. This place was held by Prussians, and had before resisted seven attacks.” Those who knew him are not surprised to hear that he died so gallantly, and that “his Platoon was easily the best in the battalion.” The same officer adds that “he was nearly always ill, but would never go sick, but kept hanging on.”

Blyth had a career full of promise at Radley. Like Geoffrey Adams, whom he succeeded as Senior Prefect for one term, he combined a variety of gifts. He won the Gibbs. Heathcote, and James Scholarships in successive years, 1913-1915. and the Worsley Prize in 1915. In this year he also won a Classical Scholarship at Corpus Christi College, Cambridge. He was in the Cricket Xl in 1915. and played a fine innings against Sherborne; and in the XV in 1914 and 1915. captaining it in the latter year. He was also a keen lover of literature and of nature, especially of birds, moths and butterflies. With these gifts and tastes he combined a character of unassuming gentleness, thoughtfulness, and charm, which gained him a multitude of friends.

His mother gave all the flowers for Chapel for the first Armistice Day service.

Aged 20

 

AND

Alick Blyth. Radley College Rugby XV, 1914

Alick Blyth. Radley College Rugby XV, 1914

Radley College Senior Prefects, 1915-1918: Adams, Blyth and Cancellor all died in WW1

Radley College Senior Prefects, 1915-1918: Adams, Blyth and Cancellor all died in WW1

James Studholme Wilson, MC, E Social 1900. Captain, Ox & Bucks LI, Royal Army Medical Corps

He qualified as a surgeon at the London Hospital.  He married in 1912 and had one son who was awarded one of the War Memorial Scholarships to come to Radley.  The family still maintain their connection with the school.

How much we shall all miss him you can perhaps understand better than I can tell you. He was hit early in the evening, but insisted on going on with his work for six hours after he was wounded. Our admiration for his gallantry and devotion to duty knows no bounds. His name will be a lasting and inspiring memory to the officers and men of this battalion. Two of the stretcher-bearers from his aid post who were with him when he died revisited the site in 1930.  They wrote a poem about the incident entitled ‘The Pilgrimage’.  This was discovered by the descendants of one of them in the 2000s. An excerpt was published in the Old Radleian in 2008.

  1. Citation for the Military Cross. Lieut. J. E. S. Wilson, R.A.M.C. He went up to the front line from his Aid Post through a very heavy barrage, in order to assist the wounded. By his pluck and skill he undoubtedly saved many lives. He afterwards controlled the evacuation of the casualties under heavy fire.

Aged 31

AND

Caotain James Wilson, MC. Royal Army Medical Corps

Caotain James Wilson, MC. Royal Army Medical Corps

Maurice Mowbray, MC, F Social 1910. Lt, 89th Field Company, Royal Engineers.  Killed in action

2016 Citation for the Military Cross. 2nd Lieut. M. C. Mowbray, R.E.

For conspicuous gallantry and determination, notably when consolidating a crater. His work was destroyed four times during the night by shell and trench mortar fire. He kept his party together, and displayed an utter disregard of personal safety.

After school, he trained with the Royal Engineers at Woolwich, intending a military career: He was absolutely fearless and very capable, and his men would follow him anywhere; if only he had been spared he would have done well in the service.

Aged 21

Lt Maurice Mowbray, MC. Killed at Passchendaele

Lt Maurice Mowbray, MC. Killed at Passchendaele

Commemorating the Fallen of WW1

Today we remember …

6th June 1917

Humphrey Arden, A Social 1906. 2nd Lt, 156th Heavy Battery, Royal Garrison Artillery.  Died of wounds received near Messines

He was a Junior Scholar, Prefect and rowed at stroke for the 1st VIII, competing at Henley twice. He went up to Queens’ College, Cambridge and rowed for the College and the University.  After a short time teaching at Eagle House Prep School, he was preparing to study for the priesthood at Cuddesdon when he joined up.

The Royal Garrison Artillery developed from fortress-based artillery located on British coasts. From 1914 when the army possessed very little heavy artillery it grew into a very large component of the British forces. It was armed with heavy, large calibre guns and howitzers that were positioned some way behind the front line and had immense destructive power.

After his death, his father gave the money for two War Memorial Scholarships in his memory. He is also remembered at his prep school in Oxford, where his story features on their WW1 memorial website.

Aged 25

AND

William Gourlay, B Social 1910. Captain, 5th Bn, Cameron Highlanders.  Died of wounds received in an unknown engagement

He was wounded on May 1st and succumbed to his injuries on June 6th. W.N. Gourlay rose to the position of House Prefect and filled the post with quiet dignity and force of character. Outside his own small circle of friends, among whom he was much loved and respected, he will possibly be chiefly remembered for his introduction of bagpipes to Radley.

Aged 21

2nd Lt Humphrey Arden, Royal Garrison Artillery. Died 6th June 1917

2nd Lt Humphrey Arden, Royal Garrison Artillery. Died 6th June 1917

Commemorating the Fallen of WW1

Today we remember …

28th April 1917

Charles MacDowell, D Social 1912. Captain, The Black Watch (Royal Highlanders).  Died of wounds received in the Battle of Arras.

He joined the Black Watch as a second lieutenant on the declaration of war. He served two years at the front with his battalion, was wounded twice, before being mortally wounded on April 8, while commanding his company. He was promoted captain shortly after his 18th birthday. His colonel writes : – “I cannot say how splendidly he has done, although so young. As keen as possible, after he was wounded his whole thoughts were for the men of his company and never once for himself.“

Aged 19

Captain Charles MacDowell, Black Watch. Died of wounds received in the Battle of Arras, 28th April 1917

Captain Charles MacDowell, Black Watch. Died of wounds received in the Battle of Arras, 28th April 1917

Commemorating the Fallen of WW1

Captain Hunt's grave at Warlincourt Halte Cemetery.  Photographed for Marching in Memory, July 2015

Captain Hunt’s grave at Warlincourt Halte Cemetery. Photographed for Marching in Memory, July 2015

Today we remember …

12th April 1917

Claude Hunt, G Social 1901. Captain, Royal Field Artillery.  Died of wounds received in an unknown engagement

After school, he worked on the Stock Exchange.  He emigrated to Canada in 1912.  He is listed by the Commonwealth War Graves Commission as a Staff Captain, attached to XVIII Corps HQ, but this is not confirmed.  He was Mentioned in Despatches. He married in 1916.

Aged 30

Captain Claude Hunt, Royal Field Artillery.  Died of wounds, 12th April 1917

Captain Claude Hunt, Royal Field Artillery. Died of wounds, 12th April 1917

Commemorating the Fallen of WW1

Today we remember …

4th April 1917

John Egerton-Leigh, G Social 1890. Captain, 10th Bn, King’s Royal Rifle Corps. Killed in action at Metz-en-Couture, during the German Retreat to the Hindenberg Line

He was a career soldier from 1897, serving in the Second South African War until 1902. He then went out to Canada as a farmer until the outbreak of WW1 in 1914.

He went to France in July 1915, and served on the Ypres Salient February to July, 1916, being wounded at Ypres. He afterwards served on the Somme, was at the taking of Guillemont, and was again wounded there, being mentioned in despatches January 4th, 1917. After he was wounded at Ypres he carried in his sergeant, who was also wounded. Finding him too heavy he came in for assistance. and went out again himself in spite of a very nasty rifle fire, and brought him in. He died leading his Company into action. After being wounded once he persevered until a bullet killed him outright. He was buried close to where he fell, just south of Metz-en-Couture and some ten miles from Cambrai.

Aged 41

Capt John Egerton-Leigh. kia 4 April 1917

Capt John Egerton-Leigh. kia 4 April 1917

Commemorating the Fallen of WW1

Today we remember …

 

3rd February 1917.  John Partington. B Social 1898. Captain, 4th Bn, Devonshire Regt.. Killed in action, Second Battle of Kut-el-Amara, Mesopotamia (modern Iraq)

‘He went up to Pembroke College, Cambridge, with an exhibition in 1903, and took honours in the Classical Tripos in 1907. At the outbreak of war he was Classical Master at St. Edward’s School, Oxford, and received his commission in the Devons in October, 1914. He was promoted temporary captain in December, 1914, and went out at that time with his battalion to India. During 1915 he was sent to Australia on special service, returning to India in the autumn of that year.  In October, 1916, he was transferred to another front, and fell in action on February 3.’

Aged 32

John Partington as a new boy, B Social, 1898

John Partington as a new boy, B Social, 1898

 

Commemorating the Fallen of WW1

Today we remember …

19th December 1916

Guy Boddington. F Social, 1906. Captain, 6th Bn, Royal Warwickshire Regt. Missing.

Guy Boddington was last seen alive on 19th December, 1916. In March 1917, The Radleian magazine reported him as ‘wounded and probably a prisoner of war in German hands.’ He is commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial alongside all those others who have no known grave.

Before the War, he worked as a woollen merchant.

Aged 25

Commemorating the Fallen of WW1

Detail of Charles Henderson's memorial window in Radley College Chapel. Photographed by Roger Shaw

Detail of Charles Henderson’s memorial window in Radley College Chapel. Photographed by Roger Shaw

Today we remember …

Battle of the Somme

17th November 1916. Charles Henderson, MC, Chevalier of the Legion of Honour. E Social, 1900. Captain, 71st Battery, Royal Field Artillery. Killed in action at Martinpuich.

From Radley he passed fourth into the Royal Military Academy, Woolwich, and was gazetted to the Royal Field Artillery in 1906. He was killed by a shell which landed on the mess dug out of his battery.

At the time of his death he had passed his balloon course, and was an interpreter in French. During his last week’s leave he obtained the Royal Aero Club’s certificate as a pilot. He served in the battles of the Aisne and Marne with the R.F.A., and joined the Royal Horse Artillery during Ypres, 1914. He was present at the battles of La Bassee, Vermelles, Loos, Hulluch, and Hohenzollern, and was awarded the Cross of the Legion of Honour for commanding his battery during the last three battles. His name was sent up three times for the Military Cross.

His Brigadier-General wrote: He had a great future in front of him. His ability alone was far above the average, and his energy and power of getting work out of his men were extraordinary. I can honestly say that no officer in France served his King and country with greater zeal, ability, and courage, and I only wish that we all possessed in the same marked degree all those qualities which go to make a first-class soldier. His services up to the time of his death had only been rewarded by the Legion of Honour, and I much regret that such a magnificent soldier had not received further recognition.

He is commemorated by a stained glass window in Radley College Chapel.

Aged 29

The British Archives of Falconry own his hawking diary, started in 1903 when he was a boy at Radley.

The grave of Charles Henderson at Flatiron Copse Cemetery. Photographed for 'Marching in Memory' for Combat Stress, July 2015

The grave of Charles Henderson at Flatiron Copse Cemetery. Photographed for ‘Marching in Memory’ for Combat Stress, July 2015

Charles Henderson, MC, Chevalier of the Legion of Honour. Captain, 71st Battery, Royal Field Artillery. kia Battle of the Somme

Charles Henderson, MC, Chevalier of the Legion of Honour. Captain, 71st Battery, Royal Field Artillery. kia Battle of the Somme

Commemorating the Fallen of WW1

Today we remember …

Battle of the Somme

15th November 1916. Edwin Charrington. D Social, 1905. Captain, 13th Bn, Essex Regt. Killed in action at Beaumont Hamel.

After leaving school, Edwin Charrington started work for Union Insurance Society of Canton, in London, with the view of going out to China later. But after two years’ service he relinquished his position, and on the outbreak of the War obtained a commission in the Essex Regiment. He left for the Front on 14th February, 1915, returning to Britain at the end of May, badly wounded and disfigured. After a few months’ leave, he rejoined his regiment, and on 31st May, 1916 he again left for the Front.

His Colonel wrote: I had the greatest regard for him and a high opinion of his capabilities as an officer. He was beloved by all who knew him, and a most gallant officer and loyal friend, and he will be keenly missed by all ranks.

He is commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial.

Aged 25

Edwin Charrington. Captain, 13th BN, Essex Regt. kia at Beaumont Hamel

Edwin Charrington. Captain, 13th Bn, Essex Regt. kia at Beaumont Hamel