A Social

Commemorating the Fallen of WW1

Today we remember …

3rd December 1917

Dominic Watson, A Social 1902. Lt, Somerset Light Infantry. Killed in action in an unknown engagement

He was the Master of Bath and County Harriers from 1911-1914.

In October, 1914, he joined the 19th Hussars as a private, but afterwards transferred to the West Somerset Yeomanry. As he was anxious to go oversea he took a commission in the Somerset Light Infantry, and left England in October, 1916. He had seen much severe fighting. His only brother fell in the South African War.

Aged 30

Lt Dominic Watson, Somerset LI

Lt Dominic Watson, Somerset LI

Commemorating the Fallen of WW1

Today we remember …

George Haggie's name on the Tyne Cot Memorial. Photographed for Marching in Memory, July 2015

George Haggie’s name on the Tyne Cot Memorial. Photographed for Marching in Memory, July 2015

Battle of Passchendaele / 3rd Battle of Ypres

2nd October 1917

George Haggie, A Social 1904. Private, 9th Bn, Yorkshire Regiment. Killed in action , 3rd Battle of Ypres

After school, he went to Magdalen College, Oxford.  He trained with the Durham Light Infantry before transferring to the Yorkshires.

Aged 27

Private George Haggie, Yorkshire Regiment. kia Passchendaele

Private George Haggie, Yorkshire Regiment. kia Passchendaele

Commemorating the Fallen of WW1

Today we remember …

6th June 1917

Humphrey Arden, A Social 1906. 2nd Lt, 156th Heavy Battery, Royal Garrison Artillery.  Died of wounds received near Messines

He was a Junior Scholar, Prefect and rowed at stroke for the 1st VIII, competing at Henley twice. He went up to Queens’ College, Cambridge and rowed for the College and the University.  After a short time teaching at Eagle House Prep School, he was preparing to study for the priesthood at Cuddesdon when he joined up.

The Royal Garrison Artillery developed from fortress-based artillery located on British coasts. From 1914 when the army possessed very little heavy artillery it grew into a very large component of the British forces. It was armed with heavy, large calibre guns and howitzers that were positioned some way behind the front line and had immense destructive power.

After his death, his father gave the money for two War Memorial Scholarships in his memory. He is also remembered at his prep school in Oxford, where his story features on their WW1 memorial website.

Aged 25

AND

William Gourlay, B Social 1910. Captain, 5th Bn, Cameron Highlanders.  Died of wounds received in an unknown engagement

He was wounded on May 1st and succumbed to his injuries on June 6th. W.N. Gourlay rose to the position of House Prefect and filled the post with quiet dignity and force of character. Outside his own small circle of friends, among whom he was much loved and respected, he will possibly be chiefly remembered for his introduction of bagpipes to Radley.

Aged 21

2nd Lt Humphrey Arden, Royal Garrison Artillery. Died 6th June 1917

2nd Lt Humphrey Arden, Royal Garrison Artillery. Died 6th June 1917

Commemorating the Fallen of WW1

Today we remember …

The grave of William Lloyd at Faubourg Arras.  Photographed for Marching in Memory, July 2015

The grave of William Lloyd at Faubourg Arras. Photographed for Marching in Memory, July 2015

19th May 1917

William Lloyd, A Social 1907. 2nd Lt, 40th Bde, Royal Field Artillery.  Killed in action, Battle of Arras.

He worked for the newly emerging car industry at the Daimler Factory in Coventry from 1911. Early in 1915 he joined the Royal Horse Artillery, and went through the Somme fighting in the ranks. He was recommended for a commission, and was gazetted to the Royal Field Artillery in February 1917.  He was killed by a German shell.

Aged 23

2nd Lt William Lloyd, Royal Field Artillery.  kia Battle of Arras

2nd Lt William Lloyd, Royal Field Artillery. kia Battle of Arras

Commemorating the Fallen of WW1

Today we remember …

Stephen Hiddingh's name on the Arras Memorial.  Photographed for Marching in Memory, July 2015

Stephen Hiddingh’s name on the Arras Memorial. Photographed for Marching in Memory, July 2015

3rd May 1917

Stephen van der Poel Hiddingh, A Social 1911. Lieutenant, 4th Bn, Royal Fusiliers.  Killed in action, Battle of Arras

Stephen Hiddingh was brought up in Cape Town, South Africa.  He spent just one year at Radley before going to school in Neuchatel, Switzerland and then to Sandhurst in 1914.

He was in the fighting at Delville Wood last year, and came home invalided in August. He returned to the front in February, and was recommended for the D.S.O. “for marked gallantry and initiative” in April. His Colonel writes: ‘He led his company with the greatest gallantry; he was first wounded in the arm, but still continued on when I understand he was killed by machine gun fire.’ He was one of the very best officers in the battalion, and had already been recommended for special recognition and the D.S.O.

He was one of the bravest men I have ever met. … His company were devoted to him, and would have followed him anywhere.“

Aged 20

Lt Stephen van der Poel Hiddingh, Royal Fusiliers. kia Battle of Arras, 3 May 1917

Lt Stephen van der Poel Hiddingh, Royal Fusiliers. kia Battle of Arras, 3 May 1917

Commemorating the Fallen of WW1

Humfrey Cole's grave at Varennes Military Cemetery. Photographed for 'Marching in Memory' July 2015

Humfrey Cole’s grave at Varennes Military Cemetery. Photographed for ‘Marching in Memory’ July 2015

Today we remember …

12th February 1917. Humfrey Cole, A Social 1910. 2nd Lt, Yorkshire Regiment

Died of wounds received in an unknown engagement in France.

He went straight into the army from school, gazetted to the London Regiment in September 1915.

Aged 20

2nd Lt Humfrey Cole, Yorkshire Regt

2nd Lt Humfrey Cole, Yorkshire Regt

Commemorating the Fallen of WW1

Today we remember …

6th February 1917. John Crichton, A Social 1897. Major, Hampshire Regt, attached Royal Engineers, Inland Water Transport. Died of pneumonia during the Mesopotamia Campaign

At school he was a Prefect and played for the Soccer XI. After school, he took up marine engineering as a career, having served his apprenticeship at Thornycroft’s. He took the degree of A.M.I.C.E. at King’s College, London. He then served his time as engineer on board the Royal Mail Company’s ships for three years, which enabled him to qualify for a chief engineer’s certificate. He joined the Hampshire Regiment at the inception of the Territorial movement, and on the outbreak of war proceeded with his battalion to India, where he served as major of his battalion till the summer of 1916, when he was specially sent by the Indian Government to the front to carry out important marine constructional work.

More men died of pneumonia during the Mesopotamia Campaign than were killed in action. He is buried in Basra.

Aged 34

Major John Crichton, Hampshire Regt

Major John Crichton, Hampshire Regt

Commemorating the Fallen of WW1

The grave of Vere Loxley at Knightsbridge Cemetery. Photographed for 'Marching in Memory' for Combat Stress, July 2015

The grave of Vere Loxley at Knightsbridge Cemetery. Photographed for ‘Marching in Memory’ for Combat Stress, July 2015

Today we remember …

Battle of the Somme

13th November 1916. Vere Loxley. A Social, 1895. Major, 1st Bn, Royal Marine Light Infantry. Killed in action at Beaumont Hamel.

Vere Loxley was a career soldier who trained at Sandhurst in 1900, then left Sandhurst one year early to join the Royal Marine Light Infantry. He was promoted to Captain in 1911 and was serving as Major when he was killed in the Royal Naval Division’s attack on Beaumont Hamel. He took part in the Gallipoli Campaign in 1915. He was mentioned in despatches.

Aged 35

His younger brother, Reginald, also a Radleian, also served at Gallipoli. Reginald was serving in the Royal Air Force when he died of pneumonia in 1918.

Vere Loxley. Major, 1st Bn, Royal Marine LI. kia Beaumont Hamel

Vere Loxley. Major, 1st Bn, Royal Marine LI. kia Beaumont Hamel

Commemorating the Fallen of WW1

The grave of William Marshall at Beulencourt. Photographed for 'Marching in Memory' for Combat Stress, July 2015

The grave of William Marshall at Beulencourt. Photographed for ‘Marching in Memory’ for Combat Stress, July 2015

Today we remember …

Battle of the Somme

12th October, 1916. William Marshall. A Social, 1910. 2nd Lt, 7th Bn, Suffolk Regt. Killed in action at Gueudecourt.

William Marshall was a member of Radley’s first Rugby XV in 1914. After school, he went to Sandhurst, intending to follow a military career. He was slightly wounded in September 1916 and had not been back at the Front for long before he was killed at Gueudecourt.

Aged 19

William Marshall, 2nd Lt, 7th Bn, Suffolk Regt. kia Battle of the Somme

William Marshall, 2nd Lt, 7th Bn, Suffolk Regt. kia Battle of the Somme