lawyer

Commemorating the Fallen of WW1

Today we remember …

Second Battle of the Somme

21st March 1918
Reginald Hodgson

John Moore, MC

Horace Stevens

Photographs of the Pozieres and Arras Memorials by Nick Bennett & Charlie Barber for ‘Marching in Memory’ July 2015

Reginald Hodgson, D Social 1893, Captain, 82nd Brigade, Royal Field Artillery. Killed in action, Second Battle of the Somme

At school he was a Junior Scholar, a Prefect and won the English Literature Prize. He represented the School at boxing and went on to receive a half-blue for both boxing and fencing for Oxford University. After school he studied at University College, Oxford, became a barrister at the Inner Temple and an underwriter at Lloyd’s. He was the youngest son of Henry John Hodgson, Master of the Supreme Court of Judicature, and of Mrs. Hodgson, of Keble Road, Oxford. He had his commission early in the war, and was Lieutenant in December, 1914; he was gazetted Captain in February, 1916.

Aged 38

 

AND

Captain Reginald Hodgson

The name of Reginald Hodgson on the Pozieres Memorial.

John Moore, MC, F Social 1907, Major, Cheshire Regt, attached 71st Cpy, Machine Gun Corps, Killed in action, Second Battle of the Somme

Cheshire Regiment, attached Machine Gun Corps (killed in action on March 21), was son of the late Captain G. H. Moore, Camden Hill, Cranbrook, Kent, and of Mrs. Moore, of Filsham House, St. Leonards-on·Sea. He was twenty-four years of age; he had promotion in the Cheshires in November, 1915, and, transferring to the Machine Gun Corps, became acting Captain in June, 1917. He was at Radley, 1907-1909, and had been mentioned twice in despatches..

Aged 24

AND

The name of John Moore, MC, on the Arras Memorial.

Horace Stevens, College Staff, Lance-Corporal, 2nd/4th Bn, Ox & Bucks LI

Killed in action, Second Battle of the Somme

The name of Horace Stevens on the Pozieres Memorial.

Commemorating the Fallen of WW1

Today we remember …

18th December 1915.  John Douglas, E Social 1891.  Major, 10th Bn, Yorkshire Regt.  Died of wounds received in an unknown engagement in France.

 

After leaving school, he went to Merton College, Oxford and then qualified as a barrister at Gray’s Inn. He spent some time in South Africa, and then went to Shanghai: ‘He was very popular in Shanghai, where he was known as “one of the best magistrates the Settlement ever had.” Latterly he had been in private practice as an advocate in the Supreme Court of China and Korea.’  He left Shanghai with a contingent of volunteers in 1914.

 

Aged 39

John Douglas, Major, 10th Bn, Yorkshire Regt.  Died of wounds 18 December 1915

John Douglas, Major, 10th Bn, Yorkshire Regt. Died of wounds 18 December 1915

Commemorating the Fallen of WW1

The name of Richard Coote on the Loos Memorial.  Photographed for 'Marching in Memory' for Combat Stress, July 2015

The name of Richard Coote on the Loos Memorial. Photographed for ‘Marching in Memory’ for Combat Stress, July 2015

Today we remember …

13th October 1915.  Richard Coote, A Social 1906.  Captain, 8th Bn, Royal Berkshire Regt.  Killed in action at Hulluch, Battle of Loos.

 

After school he trained as a lawyer at Lincoln’s Inn. Whilst living in London he was a very active supporter of the Radley Mission at St Peter’s, Wapping.

 

Aged 23.  He was one of three brothers who all served in WW1. His brother, George, fell in 1918

 

 

 

Richard Cote, Captain, 8th Bn, Royal Berkshire Regt.  kia 13 October 1915

Richard Cote, Captain, 8th Bn, Royal Berkshire Regt. kia 13 October 1915

Commemorating the Fallen of WW1

Today we remember …

25th May 1915.  Spencer Le Marchant, G Social 1895. 2nd Lt, Royal Fusiliers (City of London Regt). Died of wounds received on 25th April in the Second Battle of Ypres.Before the war he was a barrister at the Inner Temple. He joined the Inner Temple Officers’ Training Corps and was commissioned at the start of the war in 1914.

Aged 33

Spencer le Marchant, 2nd Lt, Royal Fusiliers. Died of wounds, 25 April 1915

Spencer le Marchant, 2nd Lt, Royal Fusiliers. Died of wounds, 25 April 1915

Commemorating the Fallen of WW1

The grave of Cyril Holland at St Vaast Cemetery. Photographed for 'Marching in Memory' for Combat Stress, July 2015

The grave of Cyril Holland at St Vaast Cemetery. Photographed for ‘Marching in Memory’ for Combat Stress, July 2015

Today we remember …

9th May 1915.  Today we remember two Radleians who fell on the Western Front.Cyril Holland (born Cyril Wilde), E Social 1898.  Captain, Royal Field Artillery. Killed in action at the Battle of Aubers Ridge, probably at Festubert. His brother, Vyvyan, believed that Cyril endeavoured to compensate for his father (Oscar’s) disgrace by his own courage in battle.  Cyril and Vyvyan Wilde were sent to different schools after their father’s imprisonment in Reading Gaol, and their names changed to ‘Holland’ to conceal their identities.  The name of Cyril’s father was omitted from the Radley Register until 1947.  We do not know whether his school friends or teachers knew the tragic story of Cyril Wilde’s family

Cyril Holland (nee Wilde) in the Prefects' group photo 1902

Cyril Holland (nee Wilde) in the Prefects’ group photo 1902

Lt Robert Woodward, South Wales Borderers. kia 9 May 1915

Lt Robert Woodward, South Wales Borderers. kia 9 May 1915

 Robert Woodward, A Social 1891. Lt, South Wales Borderers. He is recorded in Radley Register as ‘killed in action at Richebourg l’Avoué in an unknown engagement’.  This was originally thought to be during the 2nd Battle of Ypres, but recent research by his family has identified it as Aubers Ridge. He studied Natural Sciences at Oxford, then became a barrister, member of the Inner Temple in 1904.

The battle in which he (and I see poor Cyril Holland) died coincided in time with Second Ypres but was not part of that German assault. Instead it was part of British effort to help the French further south and it is properly called The Battle of Aubers Ridge. Robert’s records reveal he was promoted Captain just before his death and that he led A Company, 1st Battalion SWB. They took terrible casualties in a battle which, measuring losses against men engaged, was the worst yet for a British offensive.  (Information from Alan Weir, family member, 18 October 2016)
Believed to be the grave of Robert Woodward at Guards Cemetery, Windy Corner,Cuinchy. Photographed for ‘Marching in Memory’ for Combat Stress, July 2015. The family added the inscription “He set his face stedfastly” (See Luke, Chapter 9, Verse 51).

Believed to be the grave of Robert Woodward at Guards Cemetery, Windy Corner,Cuinchy. Photographed for ‘Marching in Memory’ for Combat Stress, July 2015. The family added the inscription “He set his face stedfastly” (See Luke, Chapter 9, Verse 51).