Lieutenant-Colonel

Commemorating the Fallen of WW1

Today we remember …

1st April 1918

Walter Glossop, D Social 1878. Major, 225th (Kootenay) Bn, Canadian Expeditionary Force. Died in London of illness contracted in France

At school he was a prefect and played for the Football XI. After school he became a career soldier. He retired from the Suffolk Regiment in 1905 with the rank of Major and acting Lt-Colonel. He rejoined the Army for the war, and was gazetted to the Canadian Forces. Colonel Glossop had the medal and clasp for service with the Hazara Expedition of 1888. He is buried at Brookwood Cemetery.

In 1913 he married Margaret Stirling.  Their son, Francis, was born in 1916.  He came to Radley as a War Memorial Scholar in 1930.  Francis also became a career soldier. He died of wounds received in action in North-West Europe in 1945.  The Glossops are the only father and son to be named on both the Radley War Memorials.  They are also both commemorated in Canada on the War Memorial for Kettle’s Valley. Walter’s name is among 31 Canadian remembered the Ingram Bridge Cenotaph in British Columbia, constructed in 1924.

Aged 58

Commemorating the Fallen of WW1

The grave of Richard Dundas at Cabaret Rouge.  Photographed for 'Marching in Memory' for Combat Stress, July 2015

The grave of Richard Dundas at Cabaret Rouge. Photographed for ‘Marching in Memory’ for Combat Stress, July 2015

25th September 1915

Battle of Loos

Richard Dundas, D Social 1882.  Lt-Col commanding, 11th Bn, The Royal Scots.  Reported missing, presumed killed in action on the first day of the Battle of Loos, along with most of his battalion. ‘His magnificent and heroic leadership at Loos will never be forgotten, and his loss there cannot be too much deplored. His was a great personality and attractive nature, absolutely just and true, unfailing in sympathy and courtesy to all, untiring in work, an ideal soldier, with the keenest of brains, who jealously guarded the honour and traditions of the regiment that he loved, lived, and died for, and to which his loss is irreparable.” The Times.

He was a career soldier whose family had served in the regiment since 1670. Like Cecil Palmer (killed at Gallipoli) he had come out of retirement to command one of the newly formed battalions.

Richard Dundas, Lt-Col commanding 11th Bn, Royal Scots.  Missing 25 September 1915

Richard Dundas, Lt-Col commanding 11th Bn, Royal Scots. Missing 25 September 1915

Commemorating the Fallen of WW1

Today we remember …

26th July 1915.  Cecil Palmer,  H & G Socials 1888.  Lt-Col commanding, 9th Bn, Royal Warwickshire Regt.  Killed in action at Gallipoli.  The Warwickshires were one of Kitchener’s newly recruited forces. Cecil Palmer, a career soldier, was called up from retirement to command them.  He left a widow and three children.  Aged 42

Cecil Palmer. Lt-Col commanding 9th Bn, Royal Warwickshire Regt.  kia 26 July 1915

Cecil Palmer. Lt-Col commanding 9th Bn, Royal Warwickshire Regt. kia 26 July 1915

The Helles Memorial.  Photo David Bennett, 18 May 2015

The Helles Memorial. Photo David Bennett, 18 May 2015

Cecil Palmer commemorated on the Helles Memorial.  Photo David Bennett, 18 May 2015

Cecil Palmer commemorated on the Helles Memorial. Photo David Bennett, 18 May 2015