F Social

Commemorating the Fallen of WW1

Today we remember …

The grave of Norman Albury at Aveloy.  Photographed for Marching in Memory, July 2015

The grave of Norman Albury at Aveloy. Photographed for Marching in Memory, July 2015

15th September 1917

Norman Albury, F & E Socials 1911. 2nd Lt, 21st Squadron, Royal Flying Corps. Died of wounds received in an unknown engagement

He left Radley in July 1916 and joined the RFC in February 1917. At school he was a member of the earliest Rugby XV.

Aged 19

2nd Lt Norman Albury, RFC

2nd Lt Norman Albury, RFC

Commemorating the Fallen of WW1

Today we remember …

Battle of Passchendaele / 3rd Battle of Ypres


23rd August 1917

Alick Blyth

James Wilson

Maurice Mowbray

Alick Blyth's name on the Tyne Cot Memorial. Photographed for Marching in Memory, July 2015

Alick Blyth’s name on the Tyne Cot Memorial. Photographed for Marching in Memory, July 2015

The grave of James Wilson at Lijssenthoek. Photographed for Marching in Memory, July 2015

The grave of James Wilson at Lijssenthoek. Photographed for Marching in Memory, July 2015

The grave of Maurice Mowbrary at The Huts. Photographed for Marching in Memory, July 2015

The grave of Maurice Mowbrary at The Huts. Photographed for Marching in Memory, July 2015

Alick Blyth, H Social 1910. Senior Prefect, Captain of Cricket and Radley’s first Captain of Rugby

He was killed in action on the Ypres front on Aug. 23rd, 1917, aged 20. His Company Commander writes:

Our battalion was in support, but he was detailed for a special job in the line. There was a strong point called Pond Farm giving a lot of trouble. We had taken it once, but had lost it and were going for it again. Both the D Company officers had been killed, and the remnants of the Company were going over with the attacking party without an officer. Blyth at once went to the Colonel in charge of the attack and insisted on taking this Company over, which he did. The place was captured, but he was sniped through the head. This place was held by Prussians, and had before resisted seven attacks.” Those who knew him are not surprised to hear that he died so gallantly, and that “his Platoon was easily the best in the battalion.” The same officer adds that “he was nearly always ill, but would never go sick, but kept hanging on.”

Blyth had a career full of promise at Radley. Like Geoffrey Adams, whom he succeeded as Senior Prefect for one term, he combined a variety of gifts. He won the Gibbs. Heathcote, and James Scholarships in successive years, 1913-1915. and the Worsley Prize in 1915. In this year he also won a Classical Scholarship at Corpus Christi College, Cambridge. He was in the Cricket Xl in 1915. and played a fine innings against Sherborne; and in the XV in 1914 and 1915. captaining it in the latter year. He was also a keen lover of literature and of nature, especially of birds, moths and butterflies. With these gifts and tastes he combined a character of unassuming gentleness, thoughtfulness, and charm, which gained him a multitude of friends.

His mother gave all the flowers for Chapel for the first Armistice Day service.

Aged 20

 

AND

Alick Blyth. Radley College Rugby XV, 1914

Alick Blyth. Radley College Rugby XV, 1914

Radley College Senior Prefects, 1915-1918: Adams, Blyth and Cancellor all died in WW1

Radley College Senior Prefects, 1915-1918: Adams, Blyth and Cancellor all died in WW1

James Studholme Wilson, MC, E Social 1900. Captain, Ox & Bucks LI, Royal Army Medical Corps

He qualified as a surgeon at the London Hospital.  He married in 1912 and had one son who was awarded one of the War Memorial Scholarships to come to Radley.  The family still maintain their connection with the school.

How much we shall all miss him you can perhaps understand better than I can tell you. He was hit early in the evening, but insisted on going on with his work for six hours after he was wounded. Our admiration for his gallantry and devotion to duty knows no bounds. His name will be a lasting and inspiring memory to the officers and men of this battalion. Two of the stretcher-bearers from his aid post who were with him when he died revisited the site in 1930.  They wrote a poem about the incident entitled ‘The Pilgrimage’.  This was discovered by the descendants of one of them in the 2000s. An excerpt was published in the Old Radleian in 2008.

  1. Citation for the Military Cross. Lieut. J. E. S. Wilson, R.A.M.C. He went up to the front line from his Aid Post through a very heavy barrage, in order to assist the wounded. By his pluck and skill he undoubtedly saved many lives. He afterwards controlled the evacuation of the casualties under heavy fire.

Aged 31

AND

Caotain James Wilson, MC. Royal Army Medical Corps

Caotain James Wilson, MC. Royal Army Medical Corps

Maurice Mowbray, MC, F Social 1910. Lt, 89th Field Company, Royal Engineers.  Killed in action

2016 Citation for the Military Cross. 2nd Lieut. M. C. Mowbray, R.E.

For conspicuous gallantry and determination, notably when consolidating a crater. His work was destroyed four times during the night by shell and trench mortar fire. He kept his party together, and displayed an utter disregard of personal safety.

After school, he trained with the Royal Engineers at Woolwich, intending a military career: He was absolutely fearless and very capable, and his men would follow him anywhere; if only he had been spared he would have done well in the service.

Aged 21

Lt Maurice Mowbray, MC. Killed at Passchendaele

Lt Maurice Mowbray, MC. Killed at Passchendaele

Commemorating the Fallen of WW1

Today we remember …

The grave of Charles Wilson at Level Crossing Cemetery. Photographed for Marching in Memory, July 2015

The grave of Charles Wilson at Level Crossing Cemetery. Photographed for Marching in Memory, July 2015

24th May 1917

Charles Wilson, MC, F Social 1900. 2nd Lt, 88th Cpy, Machine Gun Corps.  Killed in an unknown engagement

At school he was Head of F Social and Captain of Boats. After school, he went to Pembroke College, Oxford, where he rowed for the University, and then worked for the Dublin Stock Exchange.

Captain of the Boats at Radley, he rowed in the famous Pembroke College Eight of 1906; he also rowed in the Oxford Trial Eights in 1907. In 1912-13 he was Captain of the Lansdowne Football Club. In January, 1916, he was gazetted to the 6th Royal Munster Fusiliers from the Dublin University O.T.C., and went to the front in September, 1916. Later on he joined the Machine Gun Corps, and won the Military Cross, April 23rd, 1917. His Major writes of him : – ” His loss is very keenly felt by us, as he had become such a favourite amongst us all. He had just been awarded the Military Cross for gallantry in action on April 23rd. He was a splendid officer and a loyal and brave comrade.” Another officer writes of him :- He was one of the very best, cool and cheery in danger, and although I personally only knew him for the short period of two months, still I and all the officers, N.C.O.’s and men of the Company, learned to esteem and respect him as an example of the finest type of a soldier and gentleman. Such men as he are hard to replace, and his section would have followed him anywhere and done anything for him.’

Citation for the Military Cross He maintained control of his guns throughout the whole operations in a very effective manner. He inflicted severe losses on the enemy, and his coolness and determination was a splendid example to all.

Aged 31

2nd Lt Charles Wilson, Machine Gun Corps.  kia 24th May 1917

2nd Lt Charles Wilson, Machine Gun Corps. kia 24th May 1917

Commemorating the Fallen of WW1

Today we remember …

19th December 1916

Guy Boddington. F Social, 1906. Captain, 6th Bn, Royal Warwickshire Regt. Missing.

Guy Boddington was last seen alive on 19th December, 1916. In March 1917, The Radleian magazine reported him as ‘wounded and probably a prisoner of war in German hands.’ He is commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial alongside all those others who have no known grave.

Before the War, he worked as a woollen merchant.

Aged 25

Commemorating the Fallen of WW1

Today we remember …

24th September 1916. Alfred Benson. F Social, 1880. Major, Royal Army Medical Corps. Died on active service in the bombing of Scarborough.

Alfred Benson was a career soldier, serving as a surgeon with the RAMC. He served throughout the South African War. He was wounded at Johannesburg while attached to the Gordon Highlanders. He received the Queen’s medal with five clasps and the King’s medal with two clasps and was mentioned in Lord Kitchener’s dispatches. Already retired, at the outbreak of the War Major Benson volunteered for service, and for eight months was in France, and then with the Home Forces. He left a widow, a daughter, and a son who was also serving in France.

The bombing of Scarborough was the first attack on a civilian target on mainland Britain.

Aged 52

Alfred Benson, Major, RAMC. Killed in the bombing of Scarborough

Alfred Benson, Major, RAMC. Killed in the bombing of Scarborough

Commemorating the Fallen of WW1

Today we remember …

 

19th September 1916. Ronald Rose-Lloyd. F Social, 1898. Major, King’s African Rifles. Killed in action in East Africa (now Tanzania).

Ronald Rose-Lloyd was a career soldier who joined the Army immediately upon leaving school. He came 1st in his year in the Military Competitive Exam in 1906 and was gazetted Second Lieutenant in January, 1907. He was serving in East Africa when the War began, and then attached to the King’s African Rifles. He was Mentioned in Despatches.

He is buried in Morogoro Cemetery, Tanzania.

Aged 32

Ronald Rose-Lloyd, Major, attd. King's African Rifles. kia East Africa

Ronald Rose-Lloyd, Major, attd. King’s African Rifles. kia East Africa

Commemorating the Fallen of WW1

Today we remember …

Battle of the Somme

23rd July 1916. Reginald Settle. F Social, 1906. 2nd Lt, 15th Squadron, Royal Flying Corps. Killed in action over Hébuterne.

At Radley, he played for the Soccer XI.

He joined the Army Service Corps (Motor Transport) as a private in November, 1914, and after passing a special examination was sent to France the same week that he enlisted. He was promoted sergeant in the ASC and is shown in that uniform in the War Memorial Album photo opposite.

In June, 1916 he obtained a commission in the Royal Flying Corps. The Imperial War Museum’s ‘Lives of the First World War’ features his story:

Despite being in charge of General Haig’s motor transport Reg wanted to see more action. In the summer of 1916 he had broken up with his girlfriend. He applied to join the Royal Flying Corps. He was killed in a small plane with an open cockpit while flying over German lines. He was sitting directly behind the pilot who heard a single shot but thought it had missed them. The plane flew normally but when the plane landed the pilot found Reginald dead was a rifle wound. He wrote to tell Reginald’s parents about the circumstances of their son’s death.

Aged 25

Reginald Settle, 2nd Lt, 15th Squadron, Royal Flying Corps. kia Battle of the Somme

Reginald Settle, 2nd Lt, 15th Squadron, Royal Flying Corps. kia Battle of the Somme

Commemorating the Fallen of WW1

Today we remember …

17th June 1916.  Cecil Draper,  F Social, 1908.  Lt, 1st Bn, Middlesex Regt.  Killed in action in an unknown engagement in France.  He left school in 1910 to attend Sandhurst.

Cecil Draper’s stepfather, Frederick Wells, also a Radleian, also died on active service on the Western Front. Both are recorded on the War Memorial. Cecil’s mother, Frederick’s widow, was widowed three times before she was 45, and was left to bring up five sons. The family did not send photos for the War Memorial albums.

 

Aged 22

Memorial1

Commemorating the Fallen of WW1

Today we remember …

6th April 1916.  Leslie Inman. F Social, 1903.   2nd Lt, Wiltshire Regt.  Leslie Yardley Inman served with the Royal Scots.  He was attached to the Wiltshire Regiment, serving in Mesopotamia (modern Iraq) when he died of wounds received in the Relief of Kut-al-Amara.  At Radley, he played soccer for the Firsts. In 1906, he was Captain of Cricket. He was Head of F Social. After school, he went to Hertford College, Oxford, and then went to work for the London Stock Exchange. He joined the Public School and University Corps soon after the outbreak of war.  He received a commission in the Royal Scots in May, 1915, and left England in the following October. He served in the Gallipoli campaign, before being sent on to Mesopotamia..  There is no photo of him in the War Memorial albums. He is shown here in the Warden & Prefects group photo of 1906Aged 27

Leslie Inman, Prefect, Radley College, 1906

Leslie Inman, Prefect, Radley College, 1906