Major

Commemorating the Fallen of WW1

Today we remember …

11th November 1918

Robert Browne, DSO, F Social 1895, Major,  1st Bn, Manchester Regt. Died of pneumonia contracted on active service in Mesopotamia (modern Iraq)

At school he was a Prefect and played for the Cricket and Soccer teams. He became a soldier, serving in the South African War. He was married to Gladys Hopwood.

He was returning to England on leave when he died of pneumonia contracted in Mesopotamia. He is buried in France.

Aged 37

Robert Browne in the Radley College Cricket XI 1898

Commemorating the Fallen of WW1

Today we remember …

6th April 1918

Herbert Oldfield, D Social 1908. Major, 8th Canadian Infantry Bn, Canadian Expeditionary Force

Died of wounds received in an unknown engagement

He was born in Winnipeg, Ontario.

On leaving in 1911, he went out to British Columbia, and entered the Merchants’ Bank of Canada. When he was killed in action on April 6th, he was Major in the 8th Canadian Infantry, and had seen 3 1/2 years service. Since his death he has been mentioned in Despatches by Sir Douglas Haig.

Aged 24

The grave of Major Oldfield at Duisans. Photographed for ‘Marching in Memory’ July 2015

Commemorating the Fallen of WW1

Today we remember …

1st April 1918

Walter Glossop, D Social 1878. Major, 225th (Kootenay) Bn, Canadian Expeditionary Force. Died in London of illness contracted in France

At school he was a prefect and played for the Football XI. After school he became a career soldier. He retired from the Suffolk Regiment in 1905 with the rank of Major and acting Lt-Colonel. He rejoined the Army for the war, and was gazetted to the Canadian Forces. Colonel Glossop had the medal and clasp for service with the Hazara Expedition of 1888. He is buried at Brookwood Cemetery.

In 1913 he married Margaret Stirling.  Their son, Francis, was born in 1916.  He came to Radley as a War Memorial Scholar in 1930.  Francis also became a career soldier. He died of wounds received in action in North-West Europe in 1945.  The Glossops are the only father and son to be named on both the Radley War Memorials.  They are also both commemorated in Canada on the War Memorial for Kettle’s Valley. Walter’s name is among 31 Canadian remembered the Ingram Bridge Cenotaph in British Columbia, constructed in 1924.

Aged 58

Commemorating the Fallen of WW1

Today we remember …

Second Battle of the Somme

21st March 1918
Reginald Hodgson

John Moore, MC

Horace Stevens

Photographs of the Pozieres and Arras Memorials by Nick Bennett & Charlie Barber for ‘Marching in Memory’ July 2015

Reginald Hodgson, D Social 1893, Captain, 82nd Brigade, Royal Field Artillery. Killed in action, Second Battle of the Somme

At school he was a Junior Scholar, a Prefect and won the English Literature Prize. He represented the School at boxing and went on to receive a half-blue for both boxing and fencing for Oxford University. After school he studied at University College, Oxford, became a barrister at the Inner Temple and an underwriter at Lloyd’s. He was the youngest son of Henry John Hodgson, Master of the Supreme Court of Judicature, and of Mrs. Hodgson, of Keble Road, Oxford. He had his commission early in the war, and was Lieutenant in December, 1914; he was gazetted Captain in February, 1916.

Aged 38

 

AND

Captain Reginald Hodgson

The name of Reginald Hodgson on the Pozieres Memorial.

John Moore, MC, F Social 1907, Major, Cheshire Regt, attached 71st Cpy, Machine Gun Corps, Killed in action, Second Battle of the Somme

Cheshire Regiment, attached Machine Gun Corps (killed in action on March 21), was son of the late Captain G. H. Moore, Camden Hill, Cranbrook, Kent, and of Mrs. Moore, of Filsham House, St. Leonards-on·Sea. He was twenty-four years of age; he had promotion in the Cheshires in November, 1915, and, transferring to the Machine Gun Corps, became acting Captain in June, 1917. He was at Radley, 1907-1909, and had been mentioned twice in despatches..

Aged 24

AND

The name of John Moore, MC, on the Arras Memorial.

Horace Stevens, College Staff, Lance-Corporal, 2nd/4th Bn, Ox & Bucks LI

Killed in action, Second Battle of the Somme

The name of Horace Stevens on the Pozieres Memorial.

Commemorating the Fallen of WW1

Today we remember …

The grave of Frederick Haden at Monchy-le-Preux. Photographed for Marching in Memory, July 2015

The grave of Frederick Haden at Monchy-le-Preux. Photographed for Marching in Memory, July 2015

Battle of Passchendaele / 3rd Battle of Ypres

4th November 1917

Frederick Haden, H Social 1913. 2nd Lt, 11th Trench Mortar Battery. Killed in action, Passchendaele

Last year he passed the entrance examination at Trinity College, Cambridge, and the “Little Go,” but had not gone into residence. He went to the front on June 8, and after a short time with his battalion was attached to the T.M. Battery. His Captain expresses “the deepest sympathy and sorrow felt by the officers N.C.O.’s, and men of the battery, with whom he was a great favourite, and also the share in your loss, in that we have lost a most capable and efficient officer.”

The C.F. writes: “I had known him since his earliest days in this division, and known him for a quiet, charming boy a faithful Churchman, and quite fearless. Humanly speaking, we can ill-afford boys like that; they carry in them the promise of a tremendous manhood.”

Aged 19

AND

2nd Lt Frederick Haden. kia Passchendaele

2nd Lt Frederick Haden. kia Passchendaele

George Wilson, MC, F Social 1903. Major, 282nd Bde, Royal Field Artillery. Died of gas poisoning, Passchendaele

After school, he joined the London Stock Exchange.  He married in 1912. He joined up as a Territorial in August 1914, eventually going out to the Western Front in October 1915.  He was mentioned in despatches and promoted to the rank of acting Major.

He was one of four brothers.  His eldest brother (who also won the Military Cross) was killed in action in May 1916; his youngest brother died of wounds in November 1916.  His only surviving brother was serving at the Front with the Royal Field Artillery when George died of gas poisoning.

Aged 27

Major George Wilson, Royal Field Artillery. Died of gas poisoning, Passchendaele

Major George Wilson, Royal Field Artillery. Died of gas poisoning, Passchendaele

George Wilson's grave at Gwalia. Photographed for Marching in Memory, July 2015

George Wilson’s grave at Gwalia. Photographed for Marching in Memory, July 2015

Commemorating the Fallen of WW1

Today we remember …

14th May 1917

Alfred Mark Wardlaw, G Social 1881. Major, 9th Bn, Royal Sussex Regt.  Died at home in Sussex as a result of wounds sustained in March 1917

At school he was a Prefect, played for the Soccer XI and rowed for the VIII.  After school, he became a career soldier with the Royal Sussex Regiment, achieving the rank of Captain.  He retired in 1900.  He returned to active service in 1914, with the rank of Acting Major.

He married Alfreda, daughter of Major-General Chapman in 1894.  She died in 1914.  He added the surname ‘Wardlaw’ to his family name of ‘Mark’ in 1895.

His ashes are in Golders Green Crematorium. His shield still hangs in Hall.

Aged 49

The shield of AP Mark (aft. Wardlaw) in Radley College Hall

About Radley College’s Prefects Shields

Commemorating the Fallen of WW1

Today we remember …

6th February 1917. John Crichton, A Social 1897. Major, Hampshire Regt, attached Royal Engineers, Inland Water Transport. Died of pneumonia during the Mesopotamia Campaign

At school he was a Prefect and played for the Soccer XI. After school, he took up marine engineering as a career, having served his apprenticeship at Thornycroft’s. He took the degree of A.M.I.C.E. at King’s College, London. He then served his time as engineer on board the Royal Mail Company’s ships for three years, which enabled him to qualify for a chief engineer’s certificate. He joined the Hampshire Regiment at the inception of the Territorial movement, and on the outbreak of war proceeded with his battalion to India, where he served as major of his battalion till the summer of 1916, when he was specially sent by the Indian Government to the front to carry out important marine constructional work.

More men died of pneumonia during the Mesopotamia Campaign than were killed in action. He is buried in Basra.

Aged 34

Major John Crichton, Hampshire Regt

Major John Crichton, Hampshire Regt

Commemorating the Fallen of WW1

The grave of Vere Loxley at Knightsbridge Cemetery. Photographed for 'Marching in Memory' for Combat Stress, July 2015

The grave of Vere Loxley at Knightsbridge Cemetery. Photographed for ‘Marching in Memory’ for Combat Stress, July 2015

Today we remember …

Battle of the Somme

13th November 1916. Vere Loxley. A Social, 1895. Major, 1st Bn, Royal Marine Light Infantry. Killed in action at Beaumont Hamel.

Vere Loxley was a career soldier who trained at Sandhurst in 1900, then left Sandhurst one year early to join the Royal Marine Light Infantry. He was promoted to Captain in 1911 and was serving as Major when he was killed in the Royal Naval Division’s attack on Beaumont Hamel. He took part in the Gallipoli Campaign in 1915. He was mentioned in despatches.

Aged 35

His younger brother, Reginald, also a Radleian, also served at Gallipoli. Reginald was serving in the Royal Air Force when he died of pneumonia in 1918.

Vere Loxley. Major, 1st Bn, Royal Marine LI. kia Beaumont Hamel

Vere Loxley. Major, 1st Bn, Royal Marine LI. kia Beaumont Hamel

Commemorating the Fallen of WW1

Today we remember …

24th September 1916. Alfred Benson. F Social, 1880. Major, Royal Army Medical Corps. Died on active service in the bombing of Scarborough.

Alfred Benson was a career soldier, serving as a surgeon with the RAMC. He served throughout the South African War. He was wounded at Johannesburg while attached to the Gordon Highlanders. He received the Queen’s medal with five clasps and the King’s medal with two clasps and was mentioned in Lord Kitchener’s dispatches. Already retired, at the outbreak of the War Major Benson volunteered for service, and for eight months was in France, and then with the Home Forces. He left a widow, a daughter, and a son who was also serving in France.

The bombing of Scarborough was the first attack on a civilian target on mainland Britain.

Aged 52

Alfred Benson, Major, RAMC. Killed in the bombing of Scarborough

Alfred Benson, Major, RAMC. Killed in the bombing of Scarborough

Commemorating the Fallen of WW1

Today we remember …

 

19th September 1916. Ronald Rose-Lloyd. F Social, 1898. Major, King’s African Rifles. Killed in action in East Africa (now Tanzania).

Ronald Rose-Lloyd was a career soldier who joined the Army immediately upon leaving school. He came 1st in his year in the Military Competitive Exam in 1906 and was gazetted Second Lieutenant in January, 1907. He was serving in East Africa when the War began, and then attached to the King’s African Rifles. He was Mentioned in Despatches.

He is buried in Morogoro Cemetery, Tanzania.

Aged 32

Ronald Rose-Lloyd, Major, attd. King's African Rifles. kia East Africa

Ronald Rose-Lloyd, Major, attd. King’s African Rifles. kia East Africa