mentioned in despatches

Commemorating the Fallen of WW1

Today we remember …

11th November 1918

Robert Browne, DSO, F Social 1895, Major,  1st Bn, Manchester Regt. Died of pneumonia contracted on active service in Mesopotamia (modern Iraq)

At school he was a Prefect and played for the Cricket and Soccer teams. He became a soldier, serving in the South African War. He was married to Gladys Hopwood.

He was returning to England on leave when he died of pneumonia contracted in Mesopotamia. He is buried in France.

Aged 37

Robert Browne in the Radley College Cricket XI 1898

Commemorating the Fallen of WW1

Today we remember …

18th September 1918

Arthur Clegg-Hill, DSO, C Social 1891. Lt-Col (commanding), 12th Bn Cheshire Regt. Killed in action, Battle of P Ridge, Macedonia, Greece

At school, he played for the Soccer XI.  On leaving school, he became a career soldier and served in the 2nd South African War.  In 1902, he became a farmer in South Africa.  He returned to service on the outbreak of WW1.  He was twice mentioned in despatches and awarded the DSO.

His battalion was awarded the Croix de Guerre with Palm for the action at P Ridge:

Citation for the Croix de Guerre with Palm awarded to 12th Bn. Cheshire Regt.

A GALLANT CHESHIRE BATTALION. AWARDED THE CROIX DE GUERRE WITH PALM. On Sunday, March 2, the General Officer Commanding-in-Chief, British Salonika Force, on behalf of General Franchet d’Esperey, the G.O.C. in Command Allied Armies in the Orient, presented the 12th (Ser.) Battalion Cheshire Regiment with the Croix de Guerre with Palm, in recognition of their gallant conduct and magnificent attack on September 18, 1918. The battalion was mentioned in a French Army Order as “a marvellous battalion, which has shown the finest qualities of courage, enthusiasm, and endurance.” The order continues :- ” On September 18, 1918, gallantly led by Lt.-Col. the Hon. A. R. Clegg·Hill, D.S,O., in person, it rushed to the assault of a strongly fortified position, showing a magnificent spirit of self-sacrifice. In spite of a cross fire from artillery, trench mortar, and machine guns, and of the loss of its commanding officer, who fell mortally wounded, the battalion continued to advance, making light of its heavy casualties, and thereby giving a glorious example of heroism, and the loftiest traditions of the British Army.”

In the December dispatch of General Sir G. Milne, G.O.C. in Command, British Salonika Force, the battalion is again mentioned for its attack on the ” P” Ridge in September. “After severe fighting the 12th Battalion Cheshire Regiment succeeded in reaching the third line of trenches. At this point they came under a devastating machine gun fire, and, unable to make further progress, were eventually compelled to fall back to their original position. In their heroic attempt they had lost about 65 per cent. of their strength, including Lieutenant- Colonel the Hon. A. R, Clegg-Hill, D.S.O., who fell at the head of the battalion.”

Aged 41

Radley College Soccer XI 1896 (unnamed – includes Arthur Clegg-Hill)

Commemorating the Fallen of WW1

Today we remember …

23rd August 1918

John Gladstone, G Social 1909. Captain, 6th Bn, Leicestershire Regt. Killed in action, Battle of Albert

At school he rowed for the First VIII in 1912. After school he worked ‘with Messrs Lysaght Ltd.’ – a steel-working company in Bristol.

He joined up immediately on the outbreak of the war: received his commission on Aug. 28, 1914, in the Leicestershire Regiment. He went to France in July, 1915, and was wounded in July, 1916.He returned to France in January, 1917; he was severely wounded in the following April and was shortly afterwards promoted Captain and mentioned in dispatches. He again went to France in May and was killed on 18th September, 1918.

The Radley Register and Commonwealth War Graves Commission disagree with the obituary in The Radleian and give his date of death as 23rd August 1918.

Aged 23

Captain John Gladstone’s grave at Serre Road No 1. Photographed for ‘Marching in Memory’ July 2015

Radley College First VIII, 1912. John Gladstone at bow

Commemorating the Fallen of WW1

Today we remember …

10th August 1918

Henry Utterson, DSO. E Social 1892. Lt-Col, 15th Bn, Lancashire Fusiliers. Killed in action, Battle of Amiens

After leaving Radley he went to Sandhurst, serving with the Dorsetshire Regt. In the South African War 1899-1902 he fought at the Relief of Ladysmith and at Spion Kop

He served through the South African War (Queen’s Medal, 5 clasps, and King’s Medal, 2 clasps) and with the West African Frontier Force, 1904-1907. He served in Mesopotamia, 1914-1915,where he gained the D.S.O. and was 3 times mentioned in dispatches. He was invalided to England after being wounded at Ctesiphon. From 1917 onwards he commanded a battalion of the Lancaster Fusiliers on another front.

Citation for the DSO DISTINCTIONS. D.S,O. Major Henry Kelso Utterson, 2nd Bn. Dorsetshire Regt., for conspicuous gallantry and ability. He led his men with marked coolness and skill when assaulting a strong redoubt. He behaved very gallantly in several engagements, during one of whIch he took command of his battalion, when all the senior officers had been killed or wounded, and led a successful charge resulting in the capture of the enemy’s trenches.

He married Beatrice Hill in 1916

Aged 40

Commemorating the Fallen of WW1

Today we remember …

The VIII on the river 1903. EN Balme rowing at 2

22nd April 1918

Edward Balme, MC. A Social 1899. Lt, 11th Bn Essex Regt

Died of wounds received in an unknown engagement

He was a prefect who played for the 1st teams for football and rowing.  After school he trained at St George’s Hospital but did not continue with a medical career.  He joined up as a private with the Honourable Artillery Company in  September 1914.

In 1915 he was given a commission in the Essex Regt., and went to Gallipoli where he won the M.C. for gallantry at Sulva Bay, and was mentioned in despatches by Sir Charles Munro. Later he served in Egypt, and then in France, being invalided home in 1917. In March, 1918, he went to France again, and was mortally wounded on April 21st near Ypres, and died of wounds the next day.

Aged 33

AND

Frank Harston, MC. Don

Captain, East Lancashire Regt. Killed in action in an unknown engagement

Citation for the Military Cross. Lt. (temp. Capt.) Frank Northey Harston, E. Lanc. R. He rendered most valuable service as Brigade Major during the advance. When a gap occurred he proceeded at great risk of capture and under continuous fire to rectify matters before daylight. He set a magnificent example throughout.

He was educated at Highfield Preparatory School, Liphook (then Southampton), and Eastbourne College, and at both was head of the school. He went to Corpus Christi College, Cambridge, where he obtained a scholarship, and took first class Classical Honours. After leaving Cambridge he was at different times assistant master at Clifton College and Radley College. At the outbreak of war he joined the Public Schools Brigade, but in October, 1914, was gazetted to a commission in the Leicestershire Regiment, with which he proceeded to France in July, 1915, as captain and adjutant. In January, 1916, he was appointed to the General Staff of a Division and almost at the same time was granted a regular commission. In February, 1917, he was promoted and appointed brigade major of an infantry brigade, in which capacity he was serving at the time of his death. He had been twice mentioned in dispatches and in May of last year was awarded the Military Cross.

The modern battlefield has proved a strange school of poets, and the love of nature was never more intimate and more real, than in this nightmare of destruction and rampant mechanism. There were two men here, whom we knew well, richly endowed with that quality, – not a rare one, perhaps, but often disguised, – the love of Earth: I mean Frank Harston and his friend Lance Vidal.  The official notice of his death, in our last number, reveals nothing of the man: I can, at least, say something of my own knowledge of him as a friend.

Both these men as we knew them were sane, sterling, generous souls, devoid of affectation and vanity. Such men are not as they had never been; something endures in the consciousness of everyone who associated with them.

When nearly every incident of the past is forgotten, a few luminous scenes remain, clear in the memory, like sunlight striking on a distant hill. I remember fishing with Harston, near Bablockhithe, one afternoon in summer. He was a gay and delightful companion, as he was, I imagine, punctilious and strict in form: for he did nothing by halves. Last April he wrote to me expressing the wish that we should one day go fishing together again; and his letter recalled the whole scene most vividly, – the mown grass lying in swathes by the stream, the conversation we had sitting in the inn-garden, and the ride home in the dusk.

Personally, I shall always remember him and Vidal as men who loved earth and the sun, and who, full of the joy of living, were not afraid to enter the enchanted “Woods of Westermain,”-the mystery in nature.  In Memoriam Frank Harston

Aged 28

Lt Edward Balme

Commemorating the Fallen of WW1

Today we remember …

6th April 1918

Herbert Oldfield, D Social 1908. Major, 8th Canadian Infantry Bn, Canadian Expeditionary Force

Died of wounds received in an unknown engagement

He was born in Winnipeg, Ontario.

On leaving in 1911, he went out to British Columbia, and entered the Merchants’ Bank of Canada. When he was killed in action on April 6th, he was Major in the 8th Canadian Infantry, and had seen 3 1/2 years service. Since his death he has been mentioned in Despatches by Sir Douglas Haig.

Aged 24

The grave of Major Oldfield at Duisans. Photographed for ‘Marching in Memory’ July 2015

Commemorating the Fallen of WW1

Today we remember …

22nd March 1918

Thomas Gibbons, MC, A Social 1910, Captain, 1st Bn, Hertfordshire Regt

Killed in action, Second Battle of the Somme

At school he was a Prefect, played for the Cricket XI and was captain of the last Soccer XI before Rugby became the official school sport.

He signed up in 1914 and served in France throughout 1915-1918.  He was mentioned in despatches and awarded the Military Cross.

Tommy was one of the most popular of Radleians; absolutely straight and trusted by all. I doubt if he ever had an enemy. Amusing and inconsequent in his talk, he was always the centre of a cheery group, for it was quite impossible to feel glum or out of temper in his presence. His death will have caused great and abiding sorrow among his countless friends, for he was loved and respected by all. In Oct, 1916, he married Edith Doris Evison, of Homefield, Coulsdon Common.

Aged 23

Captain TP Gibbons, MC, Hertfordshire Regt

Radley College Soccer XI 1913. Thomas Gibbons, Captain

Commemorating the Fallen of WW1

Today we remember …

Second Battle of the Somme

21st March 1918
Reginald Hodgson

John Moore, MC

Horace Stevens

Photographs of the Pozieres and Arras Memorials by Nick Bennett & Charlie Barber for ‘Marching in Memory’ July 2015

Reginald Hodgson, D Social 1893, Captain, 82nd Brigade, Royal Field Artillery. Killed in action, Second Battle of the Somme

At school he was a Junior Scholar, a Prefect and won the English Literature Prize. He represented the School at boxing and went on to receive a half-blue for both boxing and fencing for Oxford University. After school he studied at University College, Oxford, became a barrister at the Inner Temple and an underwriter at Lloyd’s. He was the youngest son of Henry John Hodgson, Master of the Supreme Court of Judicature, and of Mrs. Hodgson, of Keble Road, Oxford. He had his commission early in the war, and was Lieutenant in December, 1914; he was gazetted Captain in February, 1916.

Aged 38

 

AND

Captain Reginald Hodgson

The name of Reginald Hodgson on the Pozieres Memorial.

John Moore, MC, F Social 1907, Major, Cheshire Regt, attached 71st Cpy, Machine Gun Corps, Killed in action, Second Battle of the Somme

Cheshire Regiment, attached Machine Gun Corps (killed in action on March 21), was son of the late Captain G. H. Moore, Camden Hill, Cranbrook, Kent, and of Mrs. Moore, of Filsham House, St. Leonards-on·Sea. He was twenty-four years of age; he had promotion in the Cheshires in November, 1915, and, transferring to the Machine Gun Corps, became acting Captain in June, 1917. He was at Radley, 1907-1909, and had been mentioned twice in despatches..

Aged 24

AND

The name of John Moore, MC, on the Arras Memorial.

Horace Stevens, College Staff, Lance-Corporal, 2nd/4th Bn, Ox & Bucks LI

Killed in action, Second Battle of the Somme

The name of Horace Stevens on the Pozieres Memorial.

Commemorating the Fallen of WW1

Today we remember …

The grave of Frederick Haden at Monchy-le-Preux. Photographed for Marching in Memory, July 2015

The grave of Frederick Haden at Monchy-le-Preux. Photographed for Marching in Memory, July 2015

Battle of Passchendaele / 3rd Battle of Ypres

4th November 1917

Frederick Haden, H Social 1913. 2nd Lt, 11th Trench Mortar Battery. Killed in action, Passchendaele

Last year he passed the entrance examination at Trinity College, Cambridge, and the “Little Go,” but had not gone into residence. He went to the front on June 8, and after a short time with his battalion was attached to the T.M. Battery. His Captain expresses “the deepest sympathy and sorrow felt by the officers N.C.O.’s, and men of the battery, with whom he was a great favourite, and also the share in your loss, in that we have lost a most capable and efficient officer.”

The C.F. writes: “I had known him since his earliest days in this division, and known him for a quiet, charming boy a faithful Churchman, and quite fearless. Humanly speaking, we can ill-afford boys like that; they carry in them the promise of a tremendous manhood.”

Aged 19

AND

2nd Lt Frederick Haden. kia Passchendaele

2nd Lt Frederick Haden. kia Passchendaele

George Wilson, MC, F Social 1903. Major, 282nd Bde, Royal Field Artillery. Died of gas poisoning, Passchendaele

After school, he joined the London Stock Exchange.  He married in 1912. He joined up as a Territorial in August 1914, eventually going out to the Western Front in October 1915.  He was mentioned in despatches and promoted to the rank of acting Major.

He was one of four brothers.  His eldest brother (who also won the Military Cross) was killed in action in May 1916; his youngest brother died of wounds in November 1916.  His only surviving brother was serving at the Front with the Royal Field Artillery when George died of gas poisoning.

Aged 27

Major George Wilson, Royal Field Artillery. Died of gas poisoning, Passchendaele

Major George Wilson, Royal Field Artillery. Died of gas poisoning, Passchendaele

George Wilson's grave at Gwalia. Photographed for Marching in Memory, July 2015

George Wilson’s grave at Gwalia. Photographed for Marching in Memory, July 2015

Commemorating the Fallen of WW1

Today we remember …

Captain John Milne's name on the Arras Flying Services Memorial. Photographed for Marching in Memory, July 2015

Captain John Milne’s name on the Arras Flying Services Memorial. Photographed for Marching in Memory, July 2015

6th October 1917.

John Milne, MC, G Social 1909. Captain, 48th Squadron, Royal Flying Corps. Missing in action on 6th October 1917.  Presumed dead, 1918

He transferred from the Ox & Bucks Light Infantry to the Royal Flying Corps.  He was mentioned in despatches. He married Joan Hanmer in 1917, just a few months before he went missing.

Citation for the Military Cross: Temp. Lt. (Temp. Capt.) J. T. Milne, Gen. List and R.F.C. Whilst leading offensive patrols, he has shown great determination and courage in attacking hostile formations, although in superior numbers, at close range. He has also done long and arduous reconnaissances and secured good photographs under very adverse conditions and heavy fire, displaying throughout an admirable spirit of fearlessness and energy.

Aged 22

Captain John Milne, MC. RFC, missing October 1917

Captain John Milne, MC. RFC, missing October 1917