Royal Flying Corps/RFC/RAF

Commemorating the Fallen of WW1

Today we remember …

Captain John Milne's name on the Arras Flying Services Memorial. Photographed for Marching in Memory, July 2015

Captain John Milne’s name on the Arras Flying Services Memorial. Photographed for Marching in Memory, July 2015

6th October 1917.

John Milne, MC, G Social 1909. Captain, 48th Squadron, Royal Flying Corps. Missing in action on 6th October 1917.  Presumed dead, 1918

He transferred from the Ox & Bucks Light Infantry to the Royal Flying Corps.  He was mentioned in despatches. He married Joan Hanmer in 1917, just a few months before he went missing.

Citation for the Military Cross: Temp. Lt. (Temp. Capt.) J. T. Milne, Gen. List and R.F.C. Whilst leading offensive patrols, he has shown great determination and courage in attacking hostile formations, although in superior numbers, at close range. He has also done long and arduous reconnaissances and secured good photographs under very adverse conditions and heavy fire, displaying throughout an admirable spirit of fearlessness and energy.

Aged 22

Captain John Milne, MC. RFC, missing October 1917

Captain John Milne, MC. RFC, missing October 1917

Commemorating the Fallen of WW1

Today we remember …

The grave of Norman Albury at Aveloy.  Photographed for Marching in Memory, July 2015

The grave of Norman Albury at Aveloy. Photographed for Marching in Memory, July 2015

15th September 1917

Norman Albury, F & E Socials 1911. 2nd Lt, 21st Squadron, Royal Flying Corps. Died of wounds received in an unknown engagement

He left Radley in July 1916 and joined the RFC in February 1917. At school he was a member of the earliest Rugby XV.

Aged 19

2nd Lt Norman Albury, RFC

2nd Lt Norman Albury, RFC

Commemorating the Fallen of WW1

Today we remember …

Clive Moore's name on the Arras Memorial.  Photographed for Marching in Memory, July 2015

Clive Moore’s name on the Arras Memorial. Photographed for Marching in Memory, July 2015

15th August 1917. Clive Moore, H Social 1910. Lt, 43rd Squadron, Royal Flying Corps. Missing in action on 15th August 1917, death confirmed in June 1918

He left Radley just as the war broke out, and took a commission in the Royal Fusiliers. Although he loved the life when training, eventually after serving in France, he transferred to the R.F.C.  He was reported missing on Aug. 15th, and it is now believed that he has been killed, as no news has been received of him since that date.

He was developing into a very strong and capable man, but it was more especially in his straightness of character that he made- his mark amongst all with whom he came into contact.

Aged 20

Commemorating the Fallen of WW1

Today we remember …

28th July 1917

Arthur O’Beirne, G Social 1901. Lt, 57th Squadron, Royal Flying Corps.  Killed in action in aerial fighting over Houthulst Forest,  Flanders

At school, he played for the Cricket XI. He then went to Exeter College, Oxford.  He was in India from 1909-1914.  He served with the East African Mounted Rifles, 1914-15, then with the Oxford Light Hussars in 1915, before joining the Royal Flying Corps.

When war broke out he had just arrived in British East Africa, and immediately enlisted as a trooper in the East African Mounted Rifles. After nine months’ fighting he was invalided home, and was then offered a commission in the Oxfordshire Yeomany. In December, 1916, he joined the R.F.C., and after obtaining his pilot’s certificate was for some time in England. He went to the front last July, and died of wounds received in action on the 28th of that month. His only brother, Lieutenant John I. M. O’Beirne, Royal Warwickshire Regiment, attached R.F.C., was killed at the front last April.

Aged 29

Lt Arthur O'Beirne, Royal Flying Corps. kia July 1917

Lt Arthur O’Beirne, Royal Flying Corps. kia July 1917

Commemorating the Fallen of WW1

The grave of Lewis Sheppard at Varennes. Photographed for Marching in Memory, July 2015

The grave of Lewis Sheppard at Varennes. Photographed for Marching in Memory, July 2015

Today we remember …

21st April 1917

Lewis Sheppard. B Social 1910. Royal Flying Corps.  Killed in a flying accident

Lewis Sheppard left Radley in 1914 to join up as a 2nd Lt in the Somerset Light Infantry. He transferred to the Royal Flying Corps in 1916.

He was a boy of more than average ability. A great talker and with many interests, he has left his mark, though he was not here long enough to become distinguished. He joined the Flying Corps and was killed on April 21 by an accident on his way back to the advanced base in Flanders.

Aged 21

2nd Lt Lewis Sheppard, RFC

2nd Lt Lewis Sheppard, RFC

Commemorating the Fallen of WW1

Today we remember …

3rd April 1917

John O’Beirne, G Social 1907. Lt, 25th Sqn, Royal Flying Corps. Killed in action on photographic reconnaissance

After school, he trained as a mining engineer. He had just finished his three years’ training at the School of Mining, Camborne, when war broke out. He joined the Special Reserve of Officers in September, 1915, and went to the front but was invalided home after the first battle of Ypres. Later he went to Sandhurst and received a commission in the regiment, joined the R.F.C., and went to the front in May, 1916.

Aged 23

His brother, Arthur, G Social 1901, was killed in July 1917

John O'Beirne, Lt, RFC.  kia April 1917

John O’Beirne, Lt, RFC. kia April 1917

Commemorating the Fallen of WW1

Today we remember …

Battle of the Somme

23rd July 1916. Reginald Settle. F Social, 1906. 2nd Lt, 15th Squadron, Royal Flying Corps. Killed in action over Hébuterne.

At Radley, he played for the Soccer XI.

He joined the Army Service Corps (Motor Transport) as a private in November, 1914, and after passing a special examination was sent to France the same week that he enlisted. He was promoted sergeant in the ASC and is shown in that uniform in the War Memorial Album photo opposite.

In June, 1916 he obtained a commission in the Royal Flying Corps. The Imperial War Museum’s ‘Lives of the First World War’ features his story:

Despite being in charge of General Haig’s motor transport Reg wanted to see more action. In the summer of 1916 he had broken up with his girlfriend. He applied to join the Royal Flying Corps. He was killed in a small plane with an open cockpit while flying over German lines. He was sitting directly behind the pilot who heard a single shot but thought it had missed them. The plane flew normally but when the plane landed the pilot found Reginald dead was a rifle wound. He wrote to tell Reginald’s parents about the circumstances of their son’s death.

Aged 25

Reginald Settle, 2nd Lt, 15th Squadron, Royal Flying Corps. kia Battle of the Somme

Reginald Settle, 2nd Lt, 15th Squadron, Royal Flying Corps. kia Battle of the Somme