2nd South African War (Boer War)

Commemorating the Fallen of WW1

Today we remember …

18th September 1918

Arthur Clegg-Hill, DSO, C Social 1891. Lt-Col (commanding), 12th Bn Cheshire Regt. Killed in action, Battle of P Ridge, Macedonia, Greece

At school, he played for the Soccer XI.  On leaving school, he became a career soldier and served in the 2nd South African War.  In 1902, he became a farmer in South Africa.  He returned to service on the outbreak of WW1.  He was twice mentioned in despatches and awarded the DSO.

His battalion was awarded the Croix de Guerre with Palm for the action at P Ridge:

Citation for the Croix de Guerre with Palm awarded to 12th Bn. Cheshire Regt.

A GALLANT CHESHIRE BATTALION. AWARDED THE CROIX DE GUERRE WITH PALM. On Sunday, March 2, the General Officer Commanding-in-Chief, British Salonika Force, on behalf of General Franchet d’Esperey, the G.O.C. in Command Allied Armies in the Orient, presented the 12th (Ser.) Battalion Cheshire Regiment with the Croix de Guerre with Palm, in recognition of their gallant conduct and magnificent attack on September 18, 1918. The battalion was mentioned in a French Army Order as “a marvellous battalion, which has shown the finest qualities of courage, enthusiasm, and endurance.” The order continues :- ” On September 18, 1918, gallantly led by Lt.-Col. the Hon. A. R. Clegg·Hill, D.S,O., in person, it rushed to the assault of a strongly fortified position, showing a magnificent spirit of self-sacrifice. In spite of a cross fire from artillery, trench mortar, and machine guns, and of the loss of its commanding officer, who fell mortally wounded, the battalion continued to advance, making light of its heavy casualties, and thereby giving a glorious example of heroism, and the loftiest traditions of the British Army.”

In the December dispatch of General Sir G. Milne, G.O.C. in Command, British Salonika Force, the battalion is again mentioned for its attack on the ” P” Ridge in September. “After severe fighting the 12th Battalion Cheshire Regiment succeeded in reaching the third line of trenches. At this point they came under a devastating machine gun fire, and, unable to make further progress, were eventually compelled to fall back to their original position. In their heroic attempt they had lost about 65 per cent. of their strength, including Lieutenant- Colonel the Hon. A. R, Clegg-Hill, D.S.O., who fell at the head of the battalion.”

Aged 41

Radley College Soccer XI 1896 (unnamed – includes Arthur Clegg-Hill)

Commemorating the Fallen of WW1

Today we remember …

10th August 1918

Henry Utterson, DSO. E Social 1892. Lt-Col, 15th Bn, Lancashire Fusiliers. Killed in action, Battle of Amiens

After leaving Radley he went to Sandhurst, serving with the Dorsetshire Regt. In the South African War 1899-1902 he fought at the Relief of Ladysmith and at Spion Kop

He served through the South African War (Queen’s Medal, 5 clasps, and King’s Medal, 2 clasps) and with the West African Frontier Force, 1904-1907. He served in Mesopotamia, 1914-1915,where he gained the D.S.O. and was 3 times mentioned in dispatches. He was invalided to England after being wounded at Ctesiphon. From 1917 onwards he commanded a battalion of the Lancaster Fusiliers on another front.

Citation for the DSO DISTINCTIONS. D.S,O. Major Henry Kelso Utterson, 2nd Bn. Dorsetshire Regt., for conspicuous gallantry and ability. He led his men with marked coolness and skill when assaulting a strong redoubt. He behaved very gallantly in several engagements, during one of whIch he took command of his battalion, when all the senior officers had been killed or wounded, and led a successful charge resulting in the capture of the enemy’s trenches.

He married Beatrice Hill in 1916

Aged 40

Commemorating the Fallen of WW1

Today we remember …

27th May 1917

Arthur Knapp, E Social 1890. Lt, Nyasaland Field Force.  Died of illness on active service in East Africa

After school, he worked for a short time as an architect, then became a career soldier, serving with the Ox & Bucks Light Infantry, then the Grahamstown Militia.  He spent 15 years as a planter in Nyasaland (now part of Malawi). He is buried in Dar-es-Salaam cemetery.

He formerly held a commission as second lieutenant in the Militia battalion of the Oxford and Bucks L.I, and served in the South African War with the Grahamstown Town Guard 1901-2, and obtained the Queen’s Medal. For the last 15 years he had been planting cotton in Nyasaland, but on the outbreak of war he joined the force for East Africa. He received a commission as assistant transport officer, and had lately been recruiting carriers from among the natives.

Aged 43

Lt Arthur Knapp, Nyasaland Field Force. Died on active service 27 May 1917

Lt Arthur Knapp, Nyasaland Field Force. Died on active service 27 May 1917

Commemorating the Fallen of WW1

Today we remember …

4th April 1917

John Egerton-Leigh, G Social 1890. Captain, 10th Bn, King’s Royal Rifle Corps. Killed in action at Metz-en-Couture, during the German Retreat to the Hindenberg Line

He was a career soldier from 1897, serving in the Second South African War until 1902. He then went out to Canada as a farmer until the outbreak of WW1 in 1914.

He went to France in July 1915, and served on the Ypres Salient February to July, 1916, being wounded at Ypres. He afterwards served on the Somme, was at the taking of Guillemont, and was again wounded there, being mentioned in despatches January 4th, 1917. After he was wounded at Ypres he carried in his sergeant, who was also wounded. Finding him too heavy he came in for assistance. and went out again himself in spite of a very nasty rifle fire, and brought him in. He died leading his Company into action. After being wounded once he persevered until a bullet killed him outright. He was buried close to where he fell, just south of Metz-en-Couture and some ten miles from Cambrai.

Aged 41

Capt John Egerton-Leigh. kia 4 April 1917

Capt John Egerton-Leigh. kia 4 April 1917

Commemorating the Fallen of WW1

Today we remember …

24th September 1916. Alfred Benson. F Social, 1880. Major, Royal Army Medical Corps. Died on active service in the bombing of Scarborough.

Alfred Benson was a career soldier, serving as a surgeon with the RAMC. He served throughout the South African War. He was wounded at Johannesburg while attached to the Gordon Highlanders. He received the Queen’s medal with five clasps and the King’s medal with two clasps and was mentioned in Lord Kitchener’s dispatches. Already retired, at the outbreak of the War Major Benson volunteered for service, and for eight months was in France, and then with the Home Forces. He left a widow, a daughter, and a son who was also serving in France.

The bombing of Scarborough was the first attack on a civilian target on mainland Britain.

Aged 52

Alfred Benson, Major, RAMC. Killed in the bombing of Scarborough

Alfred Benson, Major, RAMC. Killed in the bombing of Scarborough

Commemorating the Fallen of WW1

The grave of Lesley Douglas-Hamilton at Peronne Road Cemetery. Photographed for 'Marching in Memory' for Combat Stress, July 2015

The grave of Lesley Douglas-Hamilton at Peronne Road Cemetery. Photographed for ‘Marching in Memory’ for Combat Stress, July 2015

Today we remember …

Battle of the Somme

24th July 1916. Lesley Douglas-Hamilton. A Social, 1896. Major, Lancashire Fusiliers. Killed in action.

He was a career soldier whose original commission was in the Cameron Highlanders in September, 1901. He was promoted to Captain in 1905.  He served in the last year of the 2nd South African War and elsewhere in the colonies. He was awarded the Queen’s Medal with five clasps.

As a serving soldier, when the War began he was transferred from his original regiment and given a commission as a Major with the Lancashire Fusiliers.

Aged 35

Lesley Douglas-Hamilton, Major, Lancashire Fusiliers. kia Battle of the Somme

Lesley Douglas-Hamilton, Major, Lancashire Fusiliers. kia Battle of the Somme

Commemorating the Fallen of WW1

The grave of Roland Logan at Birr Road Cemetery.  Photographed for 'Marching in Memory' for Combat Stress, July 2015

The grave of Roland Logan at Birr Road Cemetery. Photographed for ‘Marching in Memory’ for Combat Stress, July 2015

Today we remember …

16th October 1915.  Roland Logan, E Social 1896.  Captain, 5th Bn, Ox & Bucks Light Infantry.  Killed in action, Battle of Loos.

 

He was a career soldier who had served in the Second South African War in 1900.

Aged 33

Roland Logan, Captain, 5th Bn, Ox & Bucks LI.  kia 16 October 1915

Roland Logan, Captain, 5th Bn, Ox & Bucks LI. kia 16 October 1915

Commemorating the Fallen of WW1

The grave of Richard Dundas at Cabaret Rouge.  Photographed for 'Marching in Memory' for Combat Stress, July 2015

The grave of Richard Dundas at Cabaret Rouge. Photographed for ‘Marching in Memory’ for Combat Stress, July 2015

25th September 1915

Battle of Loos

Richard Dundas, D Social 1882.  Lt-Col commanding, 11th Bn, The Royal Scots.  Reported missing, presumed killed in action on the first day of the Battle of Loos, along with most of his battalion. ‘His magnificent and heroic leadership at Loos will never be forgotten, and his loss there cannot be too much deplored. His was a great personality and attractive nature, absolutely just and true, unfailing in sympathy and courtesy to all, untiring in work, an ideal soldier, with the keenest of brains, who jealously guarded the honour and traditions of the regiment that he loved, lived, and died for, and to which his loss is irreparable.” The Times.

He was a career soldier whose family had served in the regiment since 1670. Like Cecil Palmer (killed at Gallipoli) he had come out of retirement to command one of the newly formed battalions.

Richard Dundas, Lt-Col commanding 11th Bn, Royal Scots.  Missing 25 September 1915

Richard Dundas, Lt-Col commanding 11th Bn, Royal Scots. Missing 25 September 1915

Commemorating the Fallen of WW1

Today we remember …

26th July 1915.  Cecil Palmer,  H & G Socials 1888.  Lt-Col commanding, 9th Bn, Royal Warwickshire Regt.  Killed in action at Gallipoli.  The Warwickshires were one of Kitchener’s newly recruited forces. Cecil Palmer, a career soldier, was called up from retirement to command them.  He left a widow and three children.  Aged 42

Cecil Palmer. Lt-Col commanding 9th Bn, Royal Warwickshire Regt.  kia 26 July 1915

Cecil Palmer. Lt-Col commanding 9th Bn, Royal Warwickshire Regt. kia 26 July 1915

The Helles Memorial.  Photo David Bennett, 18 May 2015

The Helles Memorial. Photo David Bennett, 18 May 2015

Cecil Palmer commemorated on the Helles Memorial.  Photo David Bennett, 18 May 2015

Cecil Palmer commemorated on the Helles Memorial. Photo David Bennett, 18 May 2015

Commemorating the Fallen of WW1

The grave of Darell Jeffreys at Chester Farm Cemetery.  Photographed for 'Marching in Memory' for Combat Stress, July 2015

The grave of Darell Jeffreys at Chester Farm Cemetery. Photographed for ‘Marching in Memory’ for Combat Stress, July 2015

Today we remember …

11th July 1915. Darell Jeffreys, B Social 1896. Captain, 1st Bn, Devonshire Regt.  Killed in action in an unknown engagement in Flanders.  He was a career soldier who had served in the Second South African War.  At Radley, he coxed the VIII.  Aged 33

Darell Jeffreys, Captain, 1st Bn Devonshire Regt.  kia 11 July 1915

Darell Jeffreys, Captain, 1st Bn Devonshire Regt. kia 11 July 1915