G Social

Commemorating the Fallen of WW1

Today we remember …

3rd April 1918

Cyprian Slocock, G Social 1910. Captain, Ox & Bucks LI. Died of wounds received in an unknown engagement

At school he was Junior Scholar and a Prefect.

died at a hospital abroad on April 3 of wounds received on March 25, aged 21, was the youngest son of the late Rev. F. H. Slocock, rector of Mottisfont, and of Mrs. Slocock, North Lodge, Maidenhead. He was educated at Lambrook, whence he gained a classical scholarship at Radley in 1910. He received his commission in November, 1914. and went to France in August, 1915. He was wounded on the Somme in 1916, and returned to the front the following year, since when he had seen much fighting. His death is in a sense one of the peculiar tragedies of this war. He was, when war broke out, looking forward to going up to Oxford and had no military desires. He was a prefect, and had been joint Editor of the Radleian, and had won the Sixth Form prize, and his instincts all pointed to a literary career. He cheerfully gave up all for his country. He became one of a little band of Old Radleian officers in the Oxford and Bucks L.l. – a sadly thinned band now alas! Ben Slocock left Radley with a singularly blameless record which he maintained to the end – an end which none was more ready to meet than he. He has fallen ‘Sed miles sed pro patria’

He is buried at Boulogne East Cemetery, Pas de Calais.

His two nephews were awarded War Memorial Scholarships at Radley.  He features in the official history of the regiment.

Aged 21

Captain Cyprian ‘Ben’ Slocock

 

Commemorating the Fallen of WW1

Today we remember …

Captain John Milne's name on the Arras Flying Services Memorial. Photographed for Marching in Memory, July 2015

Captain John Milne’s name on the Arras Flying Services Memorial. Photographed for Marching in Memory, July 2015

6th October 1917.

John Milne, MC, G Social 1909. Captain, 48th Squadron, Royal Flying Corps. Missing in action on 6th October 1917.  Presumed dead, 1918

He transferred from the Ox & Bucks Light Infantry to the Royal Flying Corps.  He was mentioned in despatches. He married Joan Hanmer in 1917, just a few months before he went missing.

Citation for the Military Cross: Temp. Lt. (Temp. Capt.) J. T. Milne, Gen. List and R.F.C. Whilst leading offensive patrols, he has shown great determination and courage in attacking hostile formations, although in superior numbers, at close range. He has also done long and arduous reconnaissances and secured good photographs under very adverse conditions and heavy fire, displaying throughout an admirable spirit of fearlessness and energy.

Aged 22

Captain John Milne, MC. RFC, missing October 1917

Captain John Milne, MC. RFC, missing October 1917

Commemorating the Fallen of WW1

Today we remember …

28th July 1917

Arthur O’Beirne, G Social 1901. Lt, 57th Squadron, Royal Flying Corps.  Killed in action in aerial fighting over Houthulst Forest,  Flanders

At school, he played for the Cricket XI. He then went to Exeter College, Oxford.  He was in India from 1909-1914.  He served with the East African Mounted Rifles, 1914-15, then with the Oxford Light Hussars in 1915, before joining the Royal Flying Corps.

When war broke out he had just arrived in British East Africa, and immediately enlisted as a trooper in the East African Mounted Rifles. After nine months’ fighting he was invalided home, and was then offered a commission in the Oxfordshire Yeomany. In December, 1916, he joined the R.F.C., and after obtaining his pilot’s certificate was for some time in England. He went to the front last July, and died of wounds received in action on the 28th of that month. His only brother, Lieutenant John I. M. O’Beirne, Royal Warwickshire Regiment, attached R.F.C., was killed at the front last April.

Aged 29

Lt Arthur O'Beirne, Royal Flying Corps. kia July 1917

Lt Arthur O’Beirne, Royal Flying Corps. kia July 1917

Commemorating the Fallen of WW1

Today we remember …

The grave of Geoffrey Hodgkinson at Brandhoek.  Photographed for Marching in Memory, July 2015

The grave of Geoffrey Hodgkinson at Brandhoek. Photographed for Marching in Memory, July 2015

24th July 1917

Geoffrey Hodgkinson, G Social 1907. Lt, Royal Field Artillery. Killed in action in an unknown engagement

He was the only son of the Rev. F. K. Hodgkinson, Vicar of St. Peter’s, Forest-gate. He represented the school in the cricket and football elevens. On leaving school he entered the Imperial Tobacco Company, Messrs. Lambert and Butler’s branch. He was in an H.A.C. battery before the war began, and immediately on the outbreak he went on active service. serving abroad as a gunner from March to December, 1915. when he returned home, and received a commission in the R.F.A. in January, 1916. He went to France in the following March, and during part of the time he was there in command of his battery.

Aged 24

Lt Geoffrey Hodgkinson, Royal Field Artillery. kia 24th July 1917

Lt Geoffrey Hodgkinson, Royal Field Artillery. kia 24th July 1917

Commemorating the Fallen of WW1

Today we remember …

The grave of Laurence Garnett at Brandhoek. Photographed for Marching in Memory, June 2015

The grave of Laurence Garnett at Brandhoek. Photographed for Marching in Memory, July 2015

7th June 1917

Laurence Garnett, G Social 1905. Lt, 100th Anti-Aircraft Battery, Royal Field Artillery. Killed in action, Battle of Messines Ridge

He played for the Cricket and Soccer XIs and represented the school at fencing.  He went to Brasenose College, Oxford.  In 1912, he emigrated to Canada, but returned on the outbreak of the War.

His elder brother was killed at Kut-el-Amara in 1915.

Aged 26

AND

Lt Laurence Garnett, Royal Field Artillery. kia Battle of Messines Ridge

Lt Laurence Garnett, Royal Field Artillery. kia Battle of Messines Ridge

Eric Lambert, MC, D Social 1896. Lt, 8th Bn, Yorkshire Regt.  Died of wounds received in an unknown engagement

At school he was a Prefect and played for the Cricket and Soccer X1s.  After school, from 1904-9, he worked as a merchant with companies in Yokohama and Kobe, Japan, and then in electrical engineering in Kobe from 1910.

Aged 34

Eric Lambert. Radley College Prefects, 1901

Eric Lambert. Radley College Prefects, 1901

The grave of Eric Lambert at Railway Dugouts. Photographed for Marching in Memory, July 2015

The grave of Eric Lambert at Railway Dugouts. Photographed for Marching in Memory, July 2015

Commemorating the Fallen of WW1

Today we remember …

1st June 1917

Norcliffe Gilpin, G Social 1887. Lt, Royal Defence Corps.  Died of pneumonia at the Military Hospital, Tidworth

He worked as a timber merchant and then as Clerk to London County Council. The Royal Defence Corps was founded in 1916 It was initially formed by converting the (Home Service) Garrison battalions of infantry regiments. Garrison battalions were composed of soldiers either too old or medically unfit for active front-line service; the Home Service status indicated they were unable to be transferred overseas. The role of the corps was to provide troops for security and guard duties inside the United Kingdom; guarding important locations such as ports or bridges. It also provided independent companies for guarding prisoner-of-war camps. The corps was never intended to be employed on overseas service.

Aged 44

Commemorating the Fallen of WW1

Today we remember …

14th May 1917

Alfred Mark Wardlaw, G Social 1881. Major, 9th Bn, Royal Sussex Regt.  Died at home in Sussex as a result of wounds sustained in March 1917

At school he was a Prefect, played for the Soccer XI and rowed for the VIII.  After school, he became a career soldier with the Royal Sussex Regiment, achieving the rank of Captain.  He retired in 1900.  He returned to active service in 1914, with the rank of Acting Major.

He married Alfreda, daughter of Major-General Chapman in 1894.  She died in 1914.  He added the surname ‘Wardlaw’ to his family name of ‘Mark’ in 1895.

His ashes are in Golders Green Crematorium. His shield still hangs in Hall.

Aged 49

The shield of AP Mark (aft. Wardlaw) in Radley College Hall

About Radley College’s Prefects Shields

Commemorating the Fallen of WW1

Captain Hunt's grave at Warlincourt Halte Cemetery.  Photographed for Marching in Memory, July 2015

Captain Hunt’s grave at Warlincourt Halte Cemetery. Photographed for Marching in Memory, July 2015

Today we remember …

12th April 1917

Claude Hunt, G Social 1901. Captain, Royal Field Artillery.  Died of wounds received in an unknown engagement

After school, he worked on the Stock Exchange.  He emigrated to Canada in 1912.  He is listed by the Commonwealth War Graves Commission as a Staff Captain, attached to XVIII Corps HQ, but this is not confirmed.  He was Mentioned in Despatches. He married in 1916.

Aged 30

Captain Claude Hunt, Royal Field Artillery.  Died of wounds, 12th April 1917

Captain Claude Hunt, Royal Field Artillery. Died of wounds, 12th April 1917

Commemorating the Fallen of WW1

Today we remember …

4th April 1917

John Egerton-Leigh, G Social 1890. Captain, 10th Bn, King’s Royal Rifle Corps. Killed in action at Metz-en-Couture, during the German Retreat to the Hindenberg Line

He was a career soldier from 1897, serving in the Second South African War until 1902. He then went out to Canada as a farmer until the outbreak of WW1 in 1914.

He went to France in July 1915, and served on the Ypres Salient February to July, 1916, being wounded at Ypres. He afterwards served on the Somme, was at the taking of Guillemont, and was again wounded there, being mentioned in despatches January 4th, 1917. After he was wounded at Ypres he carried in his sergeant, who was also wounded. Finding him too heavy he came in for assistance. and went out again himself in spite of a very nasty rifle fire, and brought him in. He died leading his Company into action. After being wounded once he persevered until a bullet killed him outright. He was buried close to where he fell, just south of Metz-en-Couture and some ten miles from Cambrai.

Aged 41

Capt John Egerton-Leigh. kia 4 April 1917

Capt John Egerton-Leigh. kia 4 April 1917

Commemorating the Fallen of WW1

Today we remember …

3rd April 1917

John O’Beirne, G Social 1907. Lt, 25th Sqn, Royal Flying Corps. Killed in action on photographic reconnaissance

After school, he trained as a mining engineer. He had just finished his three years’ training at the School of Mining, Camborne, when war broke out. He joined the Special Reserve of Officers in September, 1915, and went to the front but was invalided home after the first battle of Ypres. Later he went to Sandhurst and received a commission in the regiment, joined the R.F.C., and went to the front in May, 1916.

Aged 23

His brother, Arthur, G Social 1901, was killed in July 1917

John O'Beirne, Lt, RFC.  kia April 1917

John O’Beirne, Lt, RFC. kia April 1917