career serviceman

Commemorating the Fallen of WW1

Today we remember …

11th November 1918

Robert Browne, DSO, F Social 1895, Major,  1st Bn, Manchester Regt. Died of pneumonia contracted on active service in Mesopotamia (modern Iraq)

At school he was a Prefect and played for the Cricket and Soccer teams. He became a soldier, serving in the South African War. He was married to Gladys Hopwood.

He was returning to England on leave when he died of pneumonia contracted in Mesopotamia. He is buried in France.

Aged 37

Robert Browne in the Radley College Cricket XI 1898

Commemorating the Fallen of WW1

Today we remember …

31st October 1918

Thomas Irwin, H Social 1910. Lt. 2nd Bn, Sherwood Foresters. Died of wounds received in the Second Battle of Cambrai

At school he played for the Cricket XI and the Racquets Pair. ‘It was in the latter that he made his mark and was conspicuous at Queen’s Club for his cool and clever game. On leaving he enlisted as a private  in the P.S.B.,but later entered Sandhurst, and took a commission in the Sherwood Foresters. He was very badly wounded in 1916, being shot through the lung. He went out again to France this year, and died of wounds on Oct. 31 (received on Oct. 8).’

He died in England and is buried at Brookwood Military Cemetery.

Aged 22

Lt Thomas Irwin

Commemorating the Fallen of WW1

Today we remember …

27th September 1918

Arthur Bruce-Freeman, D Social 1910. Lt, 2nd Bn, Royal Scots Fusiliers. Killed during the Advance across Flanders

He was a member of a military family whose father also served in the 3rd Hussars.  He went straight to Sandhurst on leaving school in 1914.  He served on the Western Front throughout WW1

was known at Radley always with the initials of T. B. On leaving, he entered Sandhurst, and passed into the 3rd Hussars.In April last he was transferred to the Royal Scots Fusiliers, and was wounded a month later. He went out again on Sept. 12, and was killed on the 27th.

Aged 22

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Lt Arthur Bruce-Freeman, Royal Scots Fusiliers

James Carter, Don. Captain, 1st Bn, Grenadier Guards. Killed in action, Battle of Canal du Nord

After a distinguished career at Eton and Cambridge, where he rowed in the fine eight of 1903, J. S. Carter came to Radley as a master. and was here for five years, leaving at the end of the Summer term, 1909. He took up work at Warren Hill, and, just before the war, had taken a private school at Cromer in partnership with Mr. Hales. After the latter’s death, Mr. Carter carried on till Easter 1917, when he decided that he too would go out to the front, for he had always been a keen Territorial. He took a commission in the Grenadier Guards, and went to France early this year. In August he was made Acting Captain, and was killed on Sept. 27th.

I should think it is quite true to say that Jim never had an enemy: for he was one of those genial large-hearted giants, with whom it was impossible to feel anger, and who was popular with everyone.

Naturally when he was here he associated himself with the river, and he coached the crew of 1909: but his interests were wide and varied. He had stayed some months in Athens, and he took a keen interest in archaeology, while he was more than an enthusiastic entomologist. Many a night have I been out” sugaring” with him, and he was always ready to lend a helping hand to anyone who was keen on that subject. He was a first class skater, and competed two or three times for the “Open Bowl” at Davos, while at Leuzerheide he was deservedly the most popular man in the place. It was only this time last year that he came down to Radley to sing in a concert, and perform in the “Radley Quartette,” which for five years enjoyed some popularity while he was here.

It is hard to realize that poor old Jim is gone too, like, Sammy Hales and Lance Vidal. Truly Radley has had some cruel losses, but the loss of these three leaves a sorrow that will never fade away. In his last letter, only three weeks’ ago, he wrote, ” I would not miss this for anything. The men are simply splendid, and it is a real privilege to be with them. Keep the home fires burning and some day I shall be sitting by your fireside, with a pipe, boring you stiff with what we did in the great war.” And now he has joined all those other heroes, but he still lives enshrined. in the hearts of many devoted and sorrowing friends.

Aged 37

AND

JS Carter, from Radley College Common Room photo, 1906

Alfred Morris, F Social 1909. Lt, 1st Bn, Grenadier Guards. Killed in action, Battle of Canal du Nord

He left school in 1912 and went straight to Sandhurst. He served initially with the Royal Fusiliers from 1914, then joined the Grenadier Guards.

Aged 23

Commemorating the Fallen of WW1

Today we remember …

18th September 1918

Arthur Clegg-Hill, DSO, C Social 1891. Lt-Col (commanding), 12th Bn Cheshire Regt. Killed in action, Battle of P Ridge, Macedonia, Greece

At school, he played for the Soccer XI.  On leaving school, he became a career soldier and served in the 2nd South African War.  In 1902, he became a farmer in South Africa.  He returned to service on the outbreak of WW1.  He was twice mentioned in despatches and awarded the DSO.

His battalion was awarded the Croix de Guerre with Palm for the action at P Ridge:

Citation for the Croix de Guerre with Palm awarded to 12th Bn. Cheshire Regt.

A GALLANT CHESHIRE BATTALION. AWARDED THE CROIX DE GUERRE WITH PALM. On Sunday, March 2, the General Officer Commanding-in-Chief, British Salonika Force, on behalf of General Franchet d’Esperey, the G.O.C. in Command Allied Armies in the Orient, presented the 12th (Ser.) Battalion Cheshire Regiment with the Croix de Guerre with Palm, in recognition of their gallant conduct and magnificent attack on September 18, 1918. The battalion was mentioned in a French Army Order as “a marvellous battalion, which has shown the finest qualities of courage, enthusiasm, and endurance.” The order continues :- ” On September 18, 1918, gallantly led by Lt.-Col. the Hon. A. R. Clegg·Hill, D.S,O., in person, it rushed to the assault of a strongly fortified position, showing a magnificent spirit of self-sacrifice. In spite of a cross fire from artillery, trench mortar, and machine guns, and of the loss of its commanding officer, who fell mortally wounded, the battalion continued to advance, making light of its heavy casualties, and thereby giving a glorious example of heroism, and the loftiest traditions of the British Army.”

In the December dispatch of General Sir G. Milne, G.O.C. in Command, British Salonika Force, the battalion is again mentioned for its attack on the ” P” Ridge in September. “After severe fighting the 12th Battalion Cheshire Regiment succeeded in reaching the third line of trenches. At this point they came under a devastating machine gun fire, and, unable to make further progress, were eventually compelled to fall back to their original position. In their heroic attempt they had lost about 65 per cent. of their strength, including Lieutenant- Colonel the Hon. A. R, Clegg-Hill, D.S.O., who fell at the head of the battalion.”

Aged 41

Radley College Soccer XI 1896 (unnamed – includes Arthur Clegg-Hill)

Commemorating the Fallen of WW1

Today we remember …

21st August 1918

Nicholas van Gruisen. E Social 1904. Captain, Liverpool Regt. Killed in action, Battle of Albert

He went straight into the army on leaving school in 1909.

Aged 29

Nicholas van Gruisen’s grave at Bienvillers Military Cemetery, Pas de Calais. Photographed for ‘Marching in Memory’ July 2015

Commemorating the Fallen of WW1

Today we remember …

10th August 1918

Henry Utterson, DSO. E Social 1892. Lt-Col, 15th Bn, Lancashire Fusiliers. Killed in action, Battle of Amiens

After leaving Radley he went to Sandhurst, serving with the Dorsetshire Regt. In the South African War 1899-1902 he fought at the Relief of Ladysmith and at Spion Kop

He served through the South African War (Queen’s Medal, 5 clasps, and King’s Medal, 2 clasps) and with the West African Frontier Force, 1904-1907. He served in Mesopotamia, 1914-1915,where he gained the D.S.O. and was 3 times mentioned in dispatches. He was invalided to England after being wounded at Ctesiphon. From 1917 onwards he commanded a battalion of the Lancaster Fusiliers on another front.

Citation for the DSO DISTINCTIONS. D.S,O. Major Henry Kelso Utterson, 2nd Bn. Dorsetshire Regt., for conspicuous gallantry and ability. He led his men with marked coolness and skill when assaulting a strong redoubt. He behaved very gallantly in several engagements, during one of whIch he took command of his battalion, when all the senior officers had been killed or wounded, and led a successful charge resulting in the capture of the enemy’s trenches.

He married Beatrice Hill in 1916

Aged 40

Commemorating the Fallen of WW1

Today we remember …

1st April 1918

Walter Glossop, D Social 1878. Major, 225th (Kootenay) Bn, Canadian Expeditionary Force. Died in London of illness contracted in France

At school he was a prefect and played for the Football XI. After school he became a career soldier. He retired from the Suffolk Regiment in 1905 with the rank of Major and acting Lt-Colonel. He rejoined the Army for the war, and was gazetted to the Canadian Forces. Colonel Glossop had the medal and clasp for service with the Hazara Expedition of 1888. He is buried at Brookwood Cemetery.

In 1913 he married Margaret Stirling.  Their son, Francis, was born in 1916.  He came to Radley as a War Memorial Scholar in 1930.  Francis also became a career soldier. He died of wounds received in action in North-West Europe in 1945.  The Glossops are the only father and son to be named on both the Radley War Memorials.  They are also both commemorated in Canada on the War Memorial for Kettle’s Valley. Walter’s name is among 31 Canadian remembered the Ingram Bridge Cenotaph in British Columbia, constructed in 1924.

Aged 58

Commemorating the Fallen of WW1

Today we remember …

30th December 1917

William ffolkes, D Social 1912. 2nd Lt, King’s Royal Rifle Corps.  Killed in action in an unknown engagement

He was a Prefect and member of the Cricket1st XI.

There is no one who knew him to whom the news of Rupert ffolkes‘ death did not come as a very great grief. Some of us hardly knew he had left Sandhurst, and the appearance of his name in the Casualty Lists seemed almost incredible. It is always difficult in these times to realise that one who has been talking and laughing with us a few weeks, perhaps a few days before, has been killed, but with him it is harder than with almost any one else. It seems but as yesterday that he was batting for the School, or taking his part in Chapel Procession, and we always looked upon him as being so very young.

He had his own ideals, – very simple and very pure they were, – and them he followed with the quiet answering devotion of a Sir Galahad. Religion was a very real thing. It was the highest thing in daily life. Self was a thing that never had a place in his religion, and perhaps that was the reason why one was always sure of sympathy from him in times of trouble. He could always feel and show that he felt for the worries and anxieties of others. And then we come back to the realisation that he is gone.

Aged 19

2nd Lt William ffolkes, KRRC. kia December 1917

2nd Lt William ffolkes, KRRC. kia December 1917

Commemorating the Fallen of WW1

Today we remember …

20th October 1917

John Clark, E Social 1912. 2nd Lt, 196th Siege Battery, Royal Garrison Artillery.  Died of wounds received in an unknown engagement

He won an exhibition for mathematics while he was at Radley. He was also a member of the Officers Training Corps and of the Country Life Shooting Team in 1916-7.

He passed the Woolwich Entrance Examination in November, 1916, but being disqualified owing to short sight, joined the R.G.A. through the Maresfield Park Cadet School, whence he passed out “with honours.” 

He went to the front on September 22. His C.O writes : – “Your son had been only a short time with my battery, but he had already proved himself to be a brave and efficient officer.“

A former master writes : – ” Of all the boys I have had I should pick him out as one I could absolutely trust and honour.“

Aged 19

2nd Lt John Clark, Royal Garrison Artillery. kia 20 October 1917

2nd Lt John Clark, Royal Garrison Artillery. kia 20 October 1917

Commemorating the Fallen of WW1

Today we remember …

Battle of Passchendaele / 3rd Battle of Ypres


23rd August 1917

Alick Blyth

James Wilson

Maurice Mowbray

Alick Blyth's name on the Tyne Cot Memorial. Photographed for Marching in Memory, July 2015

Alick Blyth’s name on the Tyne Cot Memorial. Photographed for Marching in Memory, July 2015

The grave of James Wilson at Lijssenthoek. Photographed for Marching in Memory, July 2015

The grave of James Wilson at Lijssenthoek. Photographed for Marching in Memory, July 2015

The grave of Maurice Mowbrary at The Huts. Photographed for Marching in Memory, July 2015

The grave of Maurice Mowbrary at The Huts. Photographed for Marching in Memory, July 2015

Alick Blyth, H Social 1910. Senior Prefect, Captain of Cricket and Radley’s first Captain of Rugby

He was killed in action on the Ypres front on Aug. 23rd, 1917, aged 20. His Company Commander writes:

Our battalion was in support, but he was detailed for a special job in the line. There was a strong point called Pond Farm giving a lot of trouble. We had taken it once, but had lost it and were going for it again. Both the D Company officers had been killed, and the remnants of the Company were going over with the attacking party without an officer. Blyth at once went to the Colonel in charge of the attack and insisted on taking this Company over, which he did. The place was captured, but he was sniped through the head. This place was held by Prussians, and had before resisted seven attacks.” Those who knew him are not surprised to hear that he died so gallantly, and that “his Platoon was easily the best in the battalion.” The same officer adds that “he was nearly always ill, but would never go sick, but kept hanging on.”

Blyth had a career full of promise at Radley. Like Geoffrey Adams, whom he succeeded as Senior Prefect for one term, he combined a variety of gifts. He won the Gibbs. Heathcote, and James Scholarships in successive years, 1913-1915. and the Worsley Prize in 1915. In this year he also won a Classical Scholarship at Corpus Christi College, Cambridge. He was in the Cricket Xl in 1915. and played a fine innings against Sherborne; and in the XV in 1914 and 1915. captaining it in the latter year. He was also a keen lover of literature and of nature, especially of birds, moths and butterflies. With these gifts and tastes he combined a character of unassuming gentleness, thoughtfulness, and charm, which gained him a multitude of friends.

His mother gave all the flowers for Chapel for the first Armistice Day service.

Aged 20

 

AND

Alick Blyth. Radley College Rugby XV, 1914

Alick Blyth. Radley College Rugby XV, 1914

Radley College Senior Prefects, 1915-1918: Adams, Blyth and Cancellor all died in WW1

Radley College Senior Prefects, 1915-1918: Adams, Blyth and Cancellor all died in WW1

James Studholme Wilson, MC, E Social 1900. Captain, Ox & Bucks LI, Royal Army Medical Corps

He qualified as a surgeon at the London Hospital.  He married in 1912 and had one son who was awarded one of the War Memorial Scholarships to come to Radley.  The family still maintain their connection with the school.

How much we shall all miss him you can perhaps understand better than I can tell you. He was hit early in the evening, but insisted on going on with his work for six hours after he was wounded. Our admiration for his gallantry and devotion to duty knows no bounds. His name will be a lasting and inspiring memory to the officers and men of this battalion. Two of the stretcher-bearers from his aid post who were with him when he died revisited the site in 1930.  They wrote a poem about the incident entitled ‘The Pilgrimage’.  This was discovered by the descendants of one of them in the 2000s. An excerpt was published in the Old Radleian in 2008.

  1. Citation for the Military Cross. Lieut. J. E. S. Wilson, R.A.M.C. He went up to the front line from his Aid Post through a very heavy barrage, in order to assist the wounded. By his pluck and skill he undoubtedly saved many lives. He afterwards controlled the evacuation of the casualties under heavy fire.

Aged 31

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Caotain James Wilson, MC. Royal Army Medical Corps

Caotain James Wilson, MC. Royal Army Medical Corps

Maurice Mowbray, MC, F Social 1910. Lt, 89th Field Company, Royal Engineers.  Killed in action

2016 Citation for the Military Cross. 2nd Lieut. M. C. Mowbray, R.E.

For conspicuous gallantry and determination, notably when consolidating a crater. His work was destroyed four times during the night by shell and trench mortar fire. He kept his party together, and displayed an utter disregard of personal safety.

After school, he trained with the Royal Engineers at Woolwich, intending a military career: He was absolutely fearless and very capable, and his men would follow him anywhere; if only he had been spared he would have done well in the service.

Aged 21

Lt Maurice Mowbray, MC. Killed at Passchendaele

Lt Maurice Mowbray, MC. Killed at Passchendaele