A Social

Commemorating the Fallen of WW1

The grave of Walter Simpson at Berks Cemetery.  Photographed for 'Marching in Memory' for Combat Stress, July 2015

The grave of Walter Simpson at Berks Cemetery. Photographed for ‘Marching in Memory’ for Combat Stress, July 2015

Today we remember …

1st December 1915.  Walter Simpson, D Social 1900.  Trooper, 3rd Canadian Mounted Rifles, Canadian Expeditionary Force.  Killed in action in an unknown engagement in Flanders.

 

He was a good oarsman who rowed for Cambridge University Trial VIII in 1906, and won the Ladies Plate at Henley in 1907.

 

Aged 29

 

Walter Simpson, Trooper, 3rd Canadian Mounted Rifles, Canadian Expeditionary Force.  kia 1 December 1915

Walter Simpson, Trooper, 3rd Canadian Mounted Rifles, Canadian Expeditionary Force. kia 1 December 1915

Commemorating the Fallen of WW1

Today we remember …

17th November 1915.  Henry Napier, A Social 1890.  Major, 11th Bn, Sherwood Foresters.  Wounded in the Battle of Loos. Drowned in the sinking of the hospital ship HMS Anglia.

 

HMS Anglia hit a German mine just outside Dover. The majority of the wounded and nursing staff were lost. The steamer Lusitania, which came to her aid, was also destroyed by a mine after launching life boats to help save the personnel on the Anglia.

 

Henry Napier had retired from active service in 1909. He was recalled to the Sherwood Foresters in 1914.  Aged 39

Henry Napier, Major, 11th Bn, Sherwood Foresters.  Wounded and drowned 17 November 1915

Henry Napier, Major, 11th Bn, Sherwood Foresters. Wounded and drowned 17 November 1915

Commemorating the Fallen of WW1

Silver, moonstone and amethyst cross designed for Radley College by George Sedding, 1910

Silver, moonstone and amethyst cross designed for Radley College by George Sedding, 1910

Today we remember …

 

23 October 1915.  George Sedding, A Social 1896.  Lance-Corporal, 7th Bn, Norfolk Regt.  Died of wounds received in the Battle of Loos.

 

He was a silversmith, a follower of the Arts and Crafts Movement. An example of his jewellery survives in the Fitzwilliam Museum, Cambridge. In 1910, he designed and gave the cross and candlesticks which are still on the communion table in Radley College chapel. He was a committed Christian. One of his last letters home shows both his deep love of God and of the jewel bright colours of nature, written in the horror of Ploegsteert Wood:

I wrote a little prayer last night. . . . There are such a lot of stray bullets about that you want something of the sort to repeat and think of on occasions. ‘Under the shadow of Thy wings, 0 Christ, shall I rest in peace. For as in love they enfold me, I will look up and behold their shining glory, arched in a vault of dusky gold, gleaming with rainbow hues. Gold for sovereignty and power, with all the wondrous graces, charity and love, that colour Thy divinity. So shall I rest in peace, and at my death, 0 Light of Lights, give me grace to come without the shadows, and to look upon Thy most holy face.‘’

 

Aged 33

George Sedding, Lance-Corporal, 7th Bn, Norfolk Regt.  Died of wounds 23 October 1915

George Sedding, Lance-Corporal, 7th Bn, Norfolk Regt. Died of wounds 23 October 1915

Commemorating the Fallen of WW1

The name of Richard Coote on the Loos Memorial. Photographed for 'Marching in Memory' for Combat Stress, July 2015

The name of Richard Coote on the Loos Memorial. Photographed for ‘Marching in Memory’ for Combat Stress, July 2015

Today we remember …

13th October 1915.  Richard Coote, A Social 1906.  Captain, 8th Bn, Royal Berkshire Regt.  Killed in action at Hulluch, Battle of Loos.

 

After school he trained as a lawyer at Lincoln’s Inn. Whilst living in London he was a very active supporter of the Radley Mission at St Peter’s, Wapping.

 

Aged 23.  He was one of three brothers who all served in WW1. His brother, George, fell in 1918

 

 

 

Richard Cote, Captain, 8th Bn, Royal Berkshire Regt. kia 13 October 1915

Richard Cote, Captain, 8th Bn, Royal Berkshire Regt. kia 13 October 1915

Commemorating the Fallen of WW1

The grave of Malcolm Gibson at Vermelles.  Photographed for 'Marching in Memory' for Combat Stress, July 2015

The grave of Malcolm Gibson at Vermelles. Photographed for ‘Marching in Memory’ for Combat Stress, July 2015

Today we remember …

8th October 1915.  Malcolm Gibson,  A Social 1906.  Lt, 7th Bn, East Surrey Regt.  Killed in action, Battle of Loos.

 

Aged 23.  His brother, Edgar, also fell in the Great War

Malcolm Gibson, Lt, 7th Bn, East Surrey Regt. kia 8 October 1915

Malcolm Gibson, Lt, 7th Bn, East Surrey Regt. kia 8 October 1915

Commemorating the Fallen of WW1

The name of Lance Vidal on the Loos Memorial. Photographed for 'Marching in Memory' for Combat Stress, July 2015

The name of Lance Vidal on the Loos Memorial. Photographed for ‘Marching in Memory’ for Combat Stress, July 2015

25th September 1915

Battle of Loos

This must be considered the darkest day in the history of Radley College. Eleven men from the College fell on this one day during the Battle of Loos and an unknown number were wounded. Many of the men were volunteers in Kitchener’s New Army, so the list of the Fallen includes young men from Radley village who had worked for the College and the first serving schoolmaster to be killed.

Although the long-drawn out campaigns of Gallipoli, the First Battle of the Somme, the Third Battle of Ypres (Paschendaele) claimed more lives overall, 25th September must stand forever as a day of mourning.

Lancelot Vidal, Schoolmaster, Tutor of A Social.  2nd Lt, 2nd Bn, Ox & Bucks Light Infantry.  Reported missing, believed killed in action on the first day of the Battle of Loos.

‘For days, even weeks, we entertained hopes that the news might be false, but eight weeks have now elapsed, and we can now only fear the worst.  He was last seen in the German trenches in the attack on Sept. 25th. when in charge of a machine gun … it has since been learnt that he was killed by a shell whilst pushing forward with his section in the early morning of September 25.’

Lance Vidal was the first serving schoolmaster of Radley College to fall in the Great War. He volunteered in 1914, having held the post of Tutor of A Social for two weeks. He was a popular Don at Radley and was one of those instrumental in introducing and promoting rugby football as the school’s major sport. He had played for Harlequins before joining Radley. He was also Master in Charge of Cricket.

Memorial1

Commemorating the Fallen of WW1

Today we remember …

10th August 1915.  Robert Wilson, A Social 1906.  Lt, 6th Bn, Loyal North Lancashire Regt.  Killed in action at Chunuk Bair, Gallipoli  23rd October 1915.  ‘At Radley he was a prefect, and was a member of the football eleven of 1910, and the cricket eleven of 1911. On leaving Radley he went up to Exeter College, Oxford. Reported missing;  28th October 1916;  Reported missing 27th October 1917;  Previously reported missing, now presumed killed on 10th August 1915.’ Aged 23

Robert Wilson, Lt, 6th Bn, Loyal North Lancashire Regt.  Missing 10 August 1915

Robert Wilson, Lt, 6th Bn, Loyal North Lancashire Regt. Missing 10 August 1915

Robert Wilson commemorated on the Helles Memorial.  Photo David Bennett, 18 May 2015

Robert Wilson commemorated on the Helles Memorial. Photo David Bennett, 18 May 2015

The Helles Memorial.  Photo David Bennett, 18 May 2015

The Helles Memorial. Photo David Bennett, 18 May 2015

Commemorating the Fallen of WW1

Today we remember …

26th May 1915.  Henry Rogers, A Social 1894.  Captain, 5th Bn, Manchester Regt. Died of wounds received at Gallipoli. Before the War, he worked as a mining engineer.  In 1919, the War Memorial Committee received a gift of £200 in memory of HM Rogers. His son, Martin, came to A Social in 1922. Aged 36

Henry Rogers, Captain, 5th bn, Manchester Regt.  Died of wounds, 26 May 1915

Henry Rogers, Captain, 5th Bn, Manchester Regt. Died of wounds, 26 May 1915

Commemorating the Fallen of WW1

The name of John Wheen on the Le Touret Memorial.  Photographed for 'Marching in Memory' for Combat Stress, July 2015

The name of John Wheen on the Le Touret Memorial. Photographed for ‘Marching in Memory’ for Combat Stress, July 2015

Today we remember …

14th May 1915.  Today we remember two Radleians who fell, one in France, the other the first Australian Radleian to fall at Gallipoli. John Wheen, E Social 1894. Captain, 1st Bn, Liverpool Regt. Missing, presumed killed in action, Battle of Festubert (part of the 2nd Battle of Ypres).  He served in the Second South African War in 1900 and was invalided home wounded. He was wounded in France in 1914‘previously reported wounded and missing, is now officially presumed to have been killed on May 14-16, 1915.’

John Wheen, Capt 1st Bn Liverpool Regt.  Missing, presumed kia, 14 May 1915

John Wheen, Capt 1st Bn Liverpool Regt. Missing, presumed kia, 14 May 1915

Augustus Maryon-Wilson, Trooper, 2nd Australian Light Horse, Australian Imperial Force.  kia Gallipoli, 14 May 1915

Augustus Maryon-Wilson, Trooper, 2nd Australian Light Horse, Australian Imperial Force. kia Gallipoli, 14 May 1915

Augustus Maryon-Wilson, A Social 1894. Trooper, 2nd Australian Light Horse, Australian Imperial Force. Killed in action, 14-15 May, at Gallipoli.  Originally from Essex, he emigrated to Australia and became a farmer

The grave of A Maryon-Wilson at Shrapnel Valley.  Photo David Bennett, 18 May 2015

The grave of A Maryon-Wilson at Shrapnel Valley. Photo David Bennett, 18 May 2015

Shrapnel Valley Cemetery is close to ANZAC Cove.  Grave of A Maryon-Wilson in foreground.  Photo David Bennett, 18 May 2015

Shrapnel Valley Cemetery is close to ANZAC Cove. Grave of A Maryon-Wilson in foreground. Photo David Bennett, 18 May 2015

Commemorating the Fallen of WW1

The grave of Cyril Holland at St Vaast Cemetery. Photographed for 'Marching in Memory' for Combat Stress, July 2015

The grave of Cyril Holland at St Vaast Cemetery. Photographed for ‘Marching in Memory’ for Combat Stress, July 2015

Today we remember …

9th May 1915.  Today we remember two Radleians who fell on the Western Front.Cyril Holland (born Cyril Wilde), E Social 1898.  Captain, Royal Field Artillery. Killed in action at the Battle of Aubers Ridge, probably at Festubert. His brother, Vyvyan, believed that Cyril endeavoured to compensate for his father (Oscar’s) disgrace by his own courage in battle.  Cyril and Vyvyan Wilde were sent to different schools after their father’s imprisonment in Reading Gaol, and their names changed to ‘Holland’ to conceal their identities.  The name of Cyril’s father was omitted from the Radley Register until 1947.  We do not know whether his school friends or teachers knew the tragic story of Cyril Wilde’s family

Cyril Holland (nee Wilde) in the Prefects' group photo 1902

Cyril Holland (nee Wilde) in the Prefects’ group photo 1902

Lt Robert Woodward, South Wales Borderers. kia 9 May 1915

Lt Robert Woodward, South Wales Borderers. kia 9 May 1915

 Robert Woodward, A Social 1891. Lt, South Wales Borderers. He is recorded in Radley Register as ‘killed in action at Richebourg l’Avoué in an unknown engagement’.  This was originally thought to be during the 2nd Battle of Ypres, but recent research by his family has identified it as Aubers Ridge. He studied Natural Sciences at Oxford, then became a barrister, member of the Inner Temple in 1904.

The battle in which he (and I see poor Cyril Holland) died coincided in time with Second Ypres but was not part of that German assault. Instead it was part of British effort to help the French further south and it is properly called The Battle of Aubers Ridge. Robert’s records reveal he was promoted Captain just before his death and that he led A Company, 1st Battalion SWB. They took terrible casualties in a battle which, measuring losses against men engaged, was the worst yet for a British offensive.  (Information from Alan Weir, family member, 18 October 2016)
Believed to be the grave of Robert Woodward at Guards Cemetery, Windy Corner,Cuinchy. Photographed for ‘Marching in Memory’ for Combat Stress, July 2015. The family added the inscription “He set his face stedfastly” (See Luke, Chapter 9, Verse 51).

Believed to be the grave of Robert Woodward at Guards Cemetery, Windy Corner,Cuinchy. Photographed for ‘Marching in Memory’ for Combat Stress, July 2015. The family added the inscription “He set his face stedfastly” (See Luke, Chapter 9, Verse 51).