Battle of Loos

Commemorating the Fallen of WW1

The name of Basil Hoyle on the Loos Memorial.  Photographed for 'Marching in Memory' for Combat Stress, July 2015

The name of Basil Hoyle on the Loos Memorial. Photographed for ‘Marching in Memory’ for Combat Stress, July 2015

25th September 1915

Battle of Loos

 

Basil Hoyle, E Social 1906.  Captain, 9th Bn, Royal Welsh Fusiliers.  Killed in action on the first day of the Battle of Loos.

At Radley he was a serious scholar who won the Richards Gold Medal. He then went up to Balliol College, Oxford. He volunteered in 1914. He was promoted to Captain in July 1915. His grandfather was the Archbishop of York

Aged 22

Basil Hoyle, Captasin, 9th Bn, Royal Welsh Fusiliers. kia 25 September 1915

Basil Hoyle, Captasin, 9th Bn, Royal Welsh Fusiliers. kia 25 September 1915

Commemorating the Fallen of WW1

The name of Harry Woodley on the Loos Memorial. Photographed for 'Marching in Memory' for Combat Stress, July 2015

The name of Harry Woodley on the Loos Memorial. Photographed for ‘Marching in Memory’ for Combat Stress, July 2015

25th September 1915

Battle of Loos

 

Harry Woodley, College Staff.  Private, 8th Bn, Royal West Surrey Regt.  Killed in action on the first day of the Battle of Loos

Harry Woodley in Radley College servitors’ uniform 1911. Kindly sent by his family in Australia, September 1918

Commemorating the Fallen of WW1

The name of Maurice Howell on the Loos Memorial.  Photographed for 'Marching in Memory' for Combat Stress, July 2015

The name of Maurice Howell on the Loos Memorial. Photographed for ‘Marching in Memory’ for Combat Stress, July 2015

25th September 1915

Battle of Loos

 

Maurice Howell, D Social 1908.  2nd Lt, 1st Bn, Royal West Surrey Regt.  Killed in action on the first day of the Battle of Loos.

‘On the outbreak of war he obtained a nomination for Sandhurst, and received his commission in November, 1914. He left for France in the next month. His colonel writes that he was killed “while gallantly entering the German first line trench at the head of his platoon.”

Aged 19

Maurice Howell, 2nd Lt, 1st Bn, Royal West Surrey Regt. kia 25 September 1915

Maurice Howell, 2nd Lt, 1st Bn, Royal West Surrey Regt. kia 25 September 1915

Commemorating the Fallen of WW1

The name of Arthur Hill on the Loos Memorial.  Photographed for 'Marching in Memory' for Combat Stress, July 2015

The name of Arthur Hill on the Loos Memorial. Photographed for ‘Marching in Memory’ for Combat Stress, July 2015

25th September 1915

Battle of Loos

 

Arthur Hill, B Social 1906. 2nd Lt, 1st Bn, Middlesex Regt.  Killed in action on the first day of the Battle of Loos.

‘His colonel writes that he was killed instantly while leading his platoon in the most gallant manner. He was an exceptionally fine athlete; in the cricket and football teams, and ‘Victor Ludorum’ for two years. With all his successes he was one of the most modest of boys, unassuming and simple-minded, the best type of English schoolboy.’

Aged 24

Arthur Hill, 2nd Lt, 1Bn, Middlesex Regt.  Missing 25 September 1915

Arthur Hill, 2nd Lt, 1Bn, Middlesex Regt. Missing 25 September 1915

Commemorating the Fallen of WW1

The name of Arthur Egerton on the Loos Memorial.  Photographed for 'Marching in Memory' for Combat Stress

The name of Arthur Egerton on the Loos Memorial. Photographed for ‘Marching in Memory’ for Combat Stress

25th September 1915

Battle of Loos

 

Arthur Egerton,  F Social 1904.  2nd Lt, 5th Bn, Shropshire Light Infantry.  Reported missing, presumed killed in action on the first day of the Battle of Loos.

He was still listed as missing in April 1916

Memorial1

Commemorating the Fallen of WW1

The grave of Richard Dundas at Cabaret Rouge.  Photographed for 'Marching in Memory' for Combat Stress, July 2015

The grave of Richard Dundas at Cabaret Rouge. Photographed for ‘Marching in Memory’ for Combat Stress, July 2015

25th September 1915

Battle of Loos

Richard Dundas, D Social 1882.  Lt-Col commanding, 11th Bn, The Royal Scots.  Reported missing, presumed killed in action on the first day of the Battle of Loos, along with most of his battalion. ‘His magnificent and heroic leadership at Loos will never be forgotten, and his loss there cannot be too much deplored. His was a great personality and attractive nature, absolutely just and true, unfailing in sympathy and courtesy to all, untiring in work, an ideal soldier, with the keenest of brains, who jealously guarded the honour and traditions of the regiment that he loved, lived, and died for, and to which his loss is irreparable.” The Times.

He was a career soldier whose family had served in the regiment since 1670. Like Cecil Palmer (killed at Gallipoli) he had come out of retirement to command one of the newly formed battalions.

Richard Dundas, Lt-Col commanding 11th Bn, Royal Scots.  Missing 25 September 1915

Richard Dundas, Lt-Col commanding 11th Bn, Royal Scots. Missing 25 September 1915