Sandhurst

Commemorating the Fallen of WW1

The grave of William Marshall at Beulencourt. Photographed for 'Marching in Memory' for Combat Stress, July 2015

The grave of William Marshall at Beulencourt. Photographed for ‘Marching in Memory’ for Combat Stress, July 2015

Today we remember …

Battle of the Somme

12th October, 1916. William Marshall. A Social, 1910. 2nd Lt, 7th Bn, Suffolk Regt. Killed in action at Gueudecourt.

William Marshall was a member of Radley’s first Rugby XV in 1914. After school, he went to Sandhurst, intending to follow a military career. He was slightly wounded in September 1916 and had not been back at the Front for long before he was killed at Gueudecourt.

Aged 19

William Marshall, 2nd Lt, 7th Bn, Suffolk Regt. kia Battle of the Somme

William Marshall, 2nd Lt, 7th Bn, Suffolk Regt. kia Battle of the Somme

Commemorating the Fallen of WW1

Today we remember …

17th June 1916.  Cecil Draper,  F Social, 1908.  Lt, 1st Bn, Middlesex Regt.  Killed in action in an unknown engagement in France.  He left school in 1910 to attend Sandhurst.

Cecil Draper’s stepfather, Frederick Wells, also a Radleian, also died on active service on the Western Front. Both are recorded on the War Memorial. Cecil’s mother, Frederick’s widow, was widowed three times before she was 45, and was left to bring up five sons. The family did not send photos for the War Memorial albums.

 

Aged 22

Memorial1

Commemorating the Fallen of WW1

The grave of Mervyn Richardson at Point 110 Cemetery.  Photographed for 'Marching in Memory' for Combat Stress, July 2015

The grave of Mervyn Richardson at Point 110 Cemetery. Photographed for ‘Marching in Memory’ for Combat Stress, July 2015

Today we remember …

19th March 1916.  Mervyn Richardson, D Social, 1908.  Capt, 1st Bn, Royal Welsh Fusiliers.  Died of wounds received in an unknown engagement.‘Tracker’ Richardson was one of the young officers mentioned in Siegfried Sassoon’s diary, which became his fictional Memoirs of a fox-hunting man. At Radley he was Captain of the Boats, and rowed twice at Henley in the Ladies’ Plate, rowing No. 6 in the winning heat v. University College, Oxford, in 1912. He was a member of the Leander Club. After leaving school, he attended Sandhurst, then went straight out to the Western Front in 1915. He was Mentioned in Despatches.  A letter from the Regimental Chaplain to his parents describes the scene of his funeral:CHAPLAIN’S LETTER, March 22 (Wed.).

DEAR SIR,-You might care I think to know the details of your son’s burial and last resting place from the Chaplain of the Regiment?… Your son was the most gallant and best loved of a gallant band of young officers… I have been with the battalion a year, and through more than one action, yet I do not remember so solemn a funeral or such real quiet grief. It took place on Tuesday night at 9.45. The little burial ground lies in a slight hollow only 100 yards behind the front lines. The nearest village is Reanite, near Albert, but from there it is a walk of two miles over rolling chalk downs to the line. The little plot is reverently tended, and a cross already in position on the grave. At the end of the war you will find no difficulty in finding it and tending it as you like.

As we left the dug-outs for the cemetery, two canisters burst quite near with a deafening roar. There in the darkness I took the service. All the officers were present and many men. The moon came out in the middle, and shone on the grey steel helmets of the group, and made the colours of the Union Jack that lay on the body gleam. The service ended, to the roar of another German canister, more suitable perhaps to the occasion than any organ.

Eric Milner-White

Aged 22

Mervyn Richardson, Captain, 1st Bn, Royal Welsh Fusiliers.  Died of wounds 19 March 1916

Mervyn Richardson, Captain, 1st Bn, Royal Welsh Fusiliers. Died of wounds 19 March 1916

Commemorating the Fallen of WW1

The grave of William Wigan at Lijssenthoek.  Photographed for 'Marching in Memory' for Combat Stress, July 2015

The grave of William Wigan at Lijssenthoek. Photographed for ‘Marching in Memory’ for Combat Stress, July 2015

Today we remember …

23rd February 1916.  William Wigan, E Social 1909.  Lt, Royal West Kent Regt.  Died of shrapnel wounds near Ypres.   He went to Sandhurst in September 1914. 

‘ …. He was in a dug-out two and a half miles behind the firing line, with his Captain and two other subs., when a shell dropped in Battalion Commander’s Headquarters some six yards behind them. The Captain who was nearest the door went out to see what had happened and the other three must have started to follow him when another shell dropped right in the doorway wounding all three. The Captain writes: ‘I went to the dug-out to see what I could do, but your son, who looked very pale. though quite calm, waved me away, saying: “Get away, you are the only one left in the Company.” I then sent for stretcher-bearers and doctor: your son then asked for a cigarette which I gave him and lit it for him. The stretcher-bearers, four in number, then went to him, but he said, ‘Look to the others who are worse first, I shall be all right, I have got one leg broken, and am hit through the other.’ …. As I walked with him he said, ‘ Don’t look so worried about me, I shall be all right; shall see you at home.’  I then had to leave him to take my men to the trenches.

As I said good-bye to him he blew me a kiss and wished me good luck… I cannot tell you how much we valued and loved him, what a good hard-working officer he was… He was beloved of all the men of the Company, who realised his efforts for them. and what a good hard-working officer he was. . . always cheery, courageous, and energetic. . . He was taken suddenly worse on the morning of the 23rd, became unconscious about 2 pm and died about 4 pm.’

 

Aged 20

Lt William Wigan, Royal West Kent Regt.  Died of wounds 23 February 1916

Lt William Wigan, Royal West Kent Regt. Died of wounds 23 February 1916

Commemorating the Fallen of WW1

Today we remember …

28th September 1915.  Llewellyn Nash, F Social 1909.  Captain, 2nd Bn, King’s Royal Rifle Corps.  Died at Lozenghem, of wounds received in action at Vermelles during the Battle of Loos.

 

He left Radley early to go to Eton College and then to Sandhurst.

 

Aged 20.  His brother, Edward, also fell in the Great War

Llewellyn Nash, Captain, 2nd Bn, King's Royal Rifle Corps.  Died of wounds 28 September 1915

Llewellyn Nash, Captain, 2nd Bn, King’s Royal Rifle Corps. Died of wounds 28 September 1915

Commemorating the Fallen of WW1

The name of Charles King on the Loos Memorial.  Photographed for 'Marching in Memory' for Combat Stress, July 2015

The name of Charles King on the Loos Memorial. Photographed for ‘Marching in Memory’ for Combat Stress, July 2015

25th September 1915

Battle of Loos

 

Charles King, F Social 1911.  2nd Lt, 2nd Bn, South Staffordshire Regt.  He went up to Sandhurst immediately on leaving school. Killed in action on the first day of the Battle of Loos

“King … must have died like a hero, poor fellow, because the Huns have erected a large cross in their trenches on which is written: ‘In memory of Lieut. King and Lieut. Hall and several men of the S. Staffordshire Regiment who died like heroes.”’ Letter from Lt TP Gibbons

The Radleian 26.11.1915:  £5.5.0 given to the Radley Motor Ambulance Fund in memory of 2nd Lieut CW King

Aged 18

Charles King, 2nd Lt, 2nd Bn, South Staffordshire Regt.  kia 25 September 1915

Charles King, 2nd Lt, 2nd Bn, South Staffordshire Regt. kia 25 September 1915

Commemorating the Fallen of WW1

The name of Maurice Howell on the Loos Memorial.  Photographed for 'Marching in Memory' for Combat Stress, July 2015

The name of Maurice Howell on the Loos Memorial. Photographed for ‘Marching in Memory’ for Combat Stress, July 2015

25th September 1915

Battle of Loos

 

Maurice Howell, D Social 1908.  2nd Lt, 1st Bn, Royal West Surrey Regt.  Killed in action on the first day of the Battle of Loos.

‘On the outbreak of war he obtained a nomination for Sandhurst, and received his commission in November, 1914. He left for France in the next month. His colonel writes that he was killed “while gallantly entering the German first line trench at the head of his platoon.”

Aged 19

Maurice Howell, 2nd Lt, 1st Bn, Royal West Surrey Regt. kia 25 September 1915

Maurice Howell, 2nd Lt, 1st Bn, Royal West Surrey Regt. kia 25 September 1915

Commemorating the Fallen of WW1

The grave of Richard Dundas at Cabaret Rouge.  Photographed for 'Marching in Memory' for Combat Stress, July 2015

The grave of Richard Dundas at Cabaret Rouge. Photographed for ‘Marching in Memory’ for Combat Stress, July 2015

25th September 1915

Battle of Loos

Richard Dundas, D Social 1882.  Lt-Col commanding, 11th Bn, The Royal Scots.  Reported missing, presumed killed in action on the first day of the Battle of Loos, along with most of his battalion. ‘His magnificent and heroic leadership at Loos will never be forgotten, and his loss there cannot be too much deplored. His was a great personality and attractive nature, absolutely just and true, unfailing in sympathy and courtesy to all, untiring in work, an ideal soldier, with the keenest of brains, who jealously guarded the honour and traditions of the regiment that he loved, lived, and died for, and to which his loss is irreparable.” The Times.

He was a career soldier whose family had served in the regiment since 1670. Like Cecil Palmer (killed at Gallipoli) he had come out of retirement to command one of the newly formed battalions.

Richard Dundas, Lt-Col commanding 11th Bn, Royal Scots.  Missing 25 September 1915

Richard Dundas, Lt-Col commanding 11th Bn, Royal Scots. Missing 25 September 1915